Blog
About

14
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Synthetic polymers enable non-vitreous cellular cryopreservation by reducing ice crystal growth during thawing.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The cryopreservation of cells, tissue and organs is fundamental to modern biotechnology, transplantation medicine and chemical biology. The current state-of-the-art method of cryopreservation is the addition of large amounts of organic solvents such as glycerol or dimethyl sulfoxide, to promote vitrification and prevent ice formation. Here we employ a synthetic, biomimetic, polymer, which is capable of slowing the growth of ice crystals in a manner similar to antifreeze (glyco)proteins to enhance the cryopreservation of sheep and human red blood cells. We find that only 0.1 wt% of the polymer is required to attain significant cell recovery post freezing, compared with over 20 wt% required for solvent-based strategies. These results demonstrate that synthetic antifreeze (glyco)protein mimics could have a crucial role in modern regenerative medicine to improve the storage and distribution of biological material for transplantation.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 44

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Revival of spermatozoa after vitrification and dehydration at low temperatures.

           C Polge,  A Smith,  A S Parkes (1949)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Review of the oral toxicity of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA).

            Polyvinyl alcohols (PVA) (CAS no. 9002-89-5) are synthetic polymers used in a wide range of industrial, commercial, medical and food applications. The purpose of this review, this critical evaluation of the available information on PVA, is to support the safety of PVA as a coating agent for pharmaceutical and dietary supplement products. All the available information on PVA gleaned from a comprehensive search of the scientific literature were critically evaluated. Orally administered PVA is relatively harmless. The safety of PVA is based on the following: (1) the acute oral toxicity of PVA is very low, with LD(50)s in the range of 15-20 g/kg; (2) orally administered PVA is very poorly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract; (3) PVA does not accumulate in the body when administered orally; (4) PVA is not mutagenic or clastogenic; and (5) NOAELs of orally administered PVA in male and female rats were 5000 mg/kg body weight/day in the 90-day dietary study and 5000 mg/kg body weight/day in the two-generation reproduction study, which was the highest dose tested. A critical evaluation of the existing information on PVA supports its safety for use as a coating agent for pharmaceutical and dietary supplement products.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Long-term storage of tissues by cryopreservation: critical issues.

              The technique of cryopreservation (maintenance of biological samples in a state of 'suspended animation' at cryogenic temperatures), its potential use in tissue engineering applications and current obstacles to the development of effective cryopreservation methods for tissues are reviewed. A didactic overview of the principles of cryobiology and the methodology of cryopreservation is given, with emphasis on the processes of injury to cells during freezing and thawing, and how these are related to the physicochemical and biophysical changes occurring during cryopreservation. Critical issues relevant to the application of cryopreservation methods to tissues are then addressed, including heat and mass transfer limitations in these bulk systems, intrinsic differences between isolated and cultured cells, and mechanisms of freezing injury unique to tissue systems.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nat Commun
                Nature communications
                2041-1723
                2041-1723
                2014
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1 ] 1] Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK [2] Clinical Sciences Research Laboratories, University of Warwick, Clifford Bridge Road, Coventry CV2 2DX, UK [3] Molecular Organisation and Assembly in Cells (MOAC), Doctoral Training Centre, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK.
                [2 ] 1] Clinical Sciences Research Laboratories, University of Warwick, Clifford Bridge Road, Coventry CV2 2DX, UK [2].
                [3 ] Clinical Sciences Research Laboratories, University of Warwick, Clifford Bridge Road, Coventry CV2 2DX, UK.
                [4 ] Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK.
                Article
                ncomms4244
                10.1038/ncomms4244
                24488146

                Comments

                Comment on this article