600
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Sleep-dependent memory consolidation

      Nature

      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The concept of 'sleeping on a problem' is familiar to most of us. But with myriad stages of sleep, forms of memory and processes of memory encoding and consolidation, sorting out how sleep contributes to memory has been anything but straightforward. Nevertheless, converging evidence, from the molecular to the phenomenological, leaves little doubt that offline memory reprocessing during sleep is an important component of how our memories are formed and ultimately shaped.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 45

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The neurobiology of consolidations, or, how stable is the engram?

           Yadin Dudai (2003)
          Consolidation is the progressive postacquisition stabilization of long-term memory. The term is commonly used to refer to two types of processes: synaptic consolidation, which is accomplished within the first minutes to hours after learning and occurs in all memory systems studied so far; and system consolidation, which takes much longer, and in which memories that are initially dependent upon the hippocampus undergo reorganization and may become hippocampal-independent. The textbook account of consolidation is that for any item in memory, consolidation starts and ends just once. Recently, a heated debate has been revitalized on whether this is indeed the case, or, alternatively, whether memories become labile and must undergo some form of renewed consolidation every time they are activated. This debate focuses attention on fundamental issues concerning the nature of the memory trace, its maturation, persistence, retrievability, and modifiability.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Sleep-dependent learning and memory consolidation.

            While the functions of sleep remain largely unknown, one of the most exciting and contentious hypotheses is that sleep contributes importantly to memory. A large number of studies offer a substantive body of evidence supporting this role of sleep in what is becoming known as sleep-dependent memory processing. This review will provide evidence of sleep-dependent memory consolidation and sleep-dependent brain plasticity and is divided into five sections: (1) an overview of sleep stages, memory categories, and the distinct stages of memory development; (2) a review of the specific relationships between sleep and memory, both in humans and animals; (3) a survey of evidence describing sleep-dependent brain plasticity, including human brain imaging studies as well as animal studies of cellular neurophysiology and molecular biology. We close (4) with a consideration of unanswered questions as well as existing arguments against the role of sleep in learning and memory and (5) a concluding summary.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Consolidation in human motor memory.

              Learning a motor skill sets in motion neural processes that continue to evolve after practice has ended, a phenomenon known as consolidation. Here we present psychophysical evidence for this, and show that consolidation of a motor skill was disrupted when a second motor task was learned immediately after the first. There was no disruption if four hours elapsed between learning the two motor skills, with consolidation occurring gradually over this period. Previous studies in humans and other primates have found this time-dependent disruption of consolidation only in explicit memory tasks, which rely on brain structures in the medial temporal lobe. Our results indicate that motor memories, which do not depend on the medial temporal lobe, can be transformed by a similar process of consolidation. By extending the phenomenon of consolidation to motor memory, our results indicate that distinct neural systems share similar characteristics when encoding and storing new information.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature
                Nature
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0028-0836
                1476-4687
                October 2005
                October 26 2005
                October 2005
                : 437
                : 7063
                : 1272-1278
                Article
                10.1038/nature04286
                16251952
                © 2005

                Comments

                Comment on this article