Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Ultrafiltration in Diuretic-Resistant Volume Overload in Nephrotic Syndrome and Patients with Ascites due to Chronic Liver Disease

      Cardiology

      S. Karger AG

      Ultrafiltration, Refractory oedema, Nephrotic syndrome, Ascites

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Patients with nephrotic syndrome and those with cirrhosis are predisposed to salt and water retention due to reduced renal sodium excretion. Despite the prescription of low-sodium diets and diuretics, some patients develop refractory oedema. When other medical treatments have been ineffective, isolated ultrafiltration and hemofiltration have been successfully used to treat refractory nephrotic patients. Following fluid removal, patients become responsive to diuretics. In cirrhotic patients, re-infusion of ascites and paracentesis with albumin infusion have been reported to be equally effective in managing ascites refractory to diuretic and other standard therapies. Although isolated ultrafiltration has not been successful in controlling ascitic fluid, hemofiltration has been shown to be beneficial, whereas standard intermittent hemodialysis has been reported to be ineffective.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 6

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Surgical shunts and TIPS for variceal decompression in the 1990s.

          In the 1990s, liver transplantations and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) have become the most common methods to decompress portal hypertension. This center has continued to use surgical shunts for variceal bleeding in good-risk patients who continue to bleed through endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. This article reports this center's experience with surgical shunts and TIPS shunts from 1992 through 1999. Sixty-three patients (Child A, 43 patients; Child B, 20 patients) received surgical shunts: distal splenorenal, 54 patients; splenocaval, 4 patients; coronary caval, 1 patient; and mesocaval, 4 patients. Sixty-two patients had refractory variceal bleeding, and 1 patient had ascites with Budd-Chiari syndrome. Two hundred patients (Child A, 24 patients; Child B, 62 patients; Child C, 114 patients) received TIPS shunts. One hundred forty-nine patients had refractory variceal bleeding, and 51 patients had ascites, hydrothorax, or hepatorenal syndrome. Data were collected by prospective databases, protocol follow-up, and phone contact. The 30-day mortality rate was 0% for surgical shunts and 26% for TIPS shunts; the overall survival rate was 86% (median follow-up, 36 months) for surgical shunts and 53% (median follow-up, 40 months) for TIPS shunts. For surgical shunts, the portal hypertensive rebleeding rate was 6.3%; the overall rebleeding rate was 14.3%. For TIPS shunts, the overall rebleeding rate was 25.5% (30-day, 9.4%; late, 22.4%). There were 4 reinterventions for surgical shunts (6.3%); the reintervention rate for TIPS shunts in the bleeding group was 33%, and the reintervention rate in the ascites group was 9.5%. Encephalopathy was severe in 3.1% of the shunt group and mild in 17.5%; this was not systematically evaluated in the TIPS shunts patients. Surgical shunts still have a role for patients whose condition was classified as Child A and B with refractory bleeding, who achieve excellent outcomes with low morbidity and mortality rates. TIPS shunts have been used in high-risk patients with significant early and late mortality rates and have been useful in the control of refractory bleeding and as a bridge to transplantation. The comparative role of TIPS shunts versus surgical shunt in patients whose condition was classified as Child A and B is under study in a randomized controlled trial.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Hepatic encephalopathy and ascites.

            The first abnormality leading to sodium and water retention in cirrhosis is the renal tubular defect that is related to deteriorating liver function and hyperaldosteronism. With progression of liver disease and portal hypertension, renal blood flow declines because of the hepatorenal reflex, and is then maintained by the vasoactive hormonal systems. With increasing peripheral vasodilatation, intrarenal factors for maintenance of renal perfusion cause intense cortical vasoconstriction. The systemic vasoactive factors are predominantly compensatory; any attempts to counteract their action risk circulatory collapse. Future studies should be directed at intrarenal factors. The ideal drug for the treatment of portal hypertension would reduce portal pressure, increase renal blood flow, and produce insignificant changes in arterial pressure.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Influence of serum albumin on renal function in nephrotic syndrome

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                CRD
                Cardiology
                10.1159/issn.0008-6312
                Cardiology
                S. Karger AG
                978-3-8055-7380-1
                978-3-318-00820-3
                0008-6312
                1421-9751
                2001
                2001
                18 January 2002
                : 96
                : 3-4
                : 190-195
                Affiliations
                Consultant Renal Physician/Honorary Senior Lecturer, Royal Free and University College Hospital Medical School, Centre for Nephrology, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK
                Article
                47403 Cardiology 2001;96:190–195
                10.1159/000047403
                11805386
                © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                References: 36, Pages: 6
                Categories
                Paper

                Comments

                Comment on this article