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      Photoallergic contact dermatitis from topical diclofenac in Solaraze gel.

      Contact Dermatitis
      Administration, Topical, Aged, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, administration & dosage, adverse effects, Dermatitis, Photoallergic, diagnosis, etiology, Diclofenac, Female, Gels, Humans, Keratosis, drug therapy, Patch Tests

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          Abstract

          Solaraze gel (Shire Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG, Cologne, Germany) containing 3% diclofenac has been licensed in 2001 as a topical treatment for actinic keratoses. It is commonly used in dermatological practice. Undesirable effects are believed to be rare but include pruritus, paresthesia and application-site reactions (dry skin, rash, erythema, contact dermatitis and vesicobullous eruptions). Recently, a few cases of contact dermatitis due to three different allergens including diclofenac have been reported (1,2).

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