75
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Comparison of the World Health Organization (WHO) Child Growth Standards and the National Center for Health Statistics/WHO international growth reference: implications for child health programmes

      , , , , , WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study Group
      Public Health Nutrition
      Cambridge University Press (CUP)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objectives

          To compare growth patterns and estimates of malnutrition based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Child Growth Standards (‘the WHO standards’) and the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)/WHO international growth reference (‘the NCHS reference’), and discuss implications for child health programmes.

          Design

          Secondary analysis of longitudinal data to compare growth patterns (birth to 12 months) and data from two cross-sectional surveys to compare estimates of malnutrition among under-fives.

          Settings

          Bangladesh, Dominican Republic and a pooled sample of infants from North America and Northern Europe.

          Subjects

          Respectively 4787, 10 381 and 226 infants and children.

          Results

          Healthy breast-fed infants tracked along the WHO standard's weight-for-age mean Z-score while appearing to falter on the NCHS reference from 2 months onwards. Underweight rates increased during the first six months and thereafter decreased when based on the WHO standards. For all age groups stunting rates were higher according to the WHO standards. Wasting and severe wasting were substantially higher during the first half of infancy. Thereafter, the prevalence of severe wasting continued to be 1.5 to 2.5 times that of the NCHS reference. The increase in overweight rates based on the WHO standards varied by age group, with an overall relative increase of 34%.

          Conclusions

          The WHO standards provide a better tool to monitor the rapid and changing rate of growth in early infancy. Their adoption will have important implications for child health with respect to the assessment of lactation performance and the adequacy of infant feeding. Population estimates of malnutrition will vary by age, growth indicator and the nutritional status of index populations.

          Related collections

          Most cited references6

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Breastfeeding and the use of human milk.

          Considerable advances have occurred in recent years in the scientific knowledge of the benefits of breastfeeding, the mechanisms underlying these benefits, and in the clinical management of breastfeeding. This policy statement on breastfeeding replaces the 1997 policy statement of the American Academy of Pediatrics and reflects this newer knowledge and the supporting publications. The benefits of breastfeeding for the infant, the mother, and the community are summarized, and recommendations to guide the pediatrician and other health care professionals in assisting mothers in the initiation and maintenance of breastfeeding for healthy term infants and high-risk infants are presented. The policy statement delineates various ways in which pediatricians can promote, protect, and support breastfeeding not only in their individual practices but also in the hospital, medical school, community, and nation.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Construction of the World Health Organization child growth standards: selection of methods for attained growth curves.

            The World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with a number of research institutions worldwide, is developing new child growth standards. As part of a broad consultative process for selecting the best statistical methods, WHO convened a group of statisticians and child growth experts to review available methods, develop a strategy for assessing their strengths and weaknesses, and discuss methodological issues likely to be faced in the process of constructing the new growth curves. To select the method(s) to be used, the group proposed a two-stage decision-making process. First, to select a few relevant methods based on a list of set criteria and, second, to compare the methods using available tests or other established procedures. The group reviewed 30 methods for attained growth curves. Using the pre-defined criteria, a few were selected combining five distributions and two smoothing techniques. Because the number of selected methods was considered too large to be fully tested, a preliminary study was recommended to evaluate goodness of fit of the five distributions. Methods based on distributions with poor performance will be eliminated and the remaining methods fully tested and compared. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Physical growth: National Center for Health Statistics percentiles.

              Anthropometry is an effective and frequently performed child health and nutrition screening procedure. The value of physical growth data depends on their accuracy and reliability, how they are recorded and interpreted, and what follow-up efforts are made after identification of growth abnormality. The new National Center for Health Statistics percentiles can be used to improve identification of potential health and nutritional problems and to facilitate the epidemological comparison of one group of children with others.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Public Health Nutrition
                Public Health Nutr.
                Cambridge University Press (CUP)
                1368-9800
                1475-2727
                October 2006
                January 02 2007
                October 2006
                : 9
                : 7
                : 942-947
                Article
                10.1017/PHN20062005
                17010261
                dc1511ec-5a0b-4df6-8a92-e4d862a0c8c1
                © 2006

                https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article