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      An orthopaedic enhanced recovery pathway

        ,

      Current Anaesthesia & Critical Care

      Elsevier BV

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          Most cited references 26

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          Predictors of length of stay and patient satisfaction after hip and knee replacement surgery: fast-track experience in 712 patients.

          Very few studies have focused on patient characteristics that influence length of stay (LOS) in fast-track total hip (THR) and knee arthroplasty (TKR). The aim of this prospective study was to identify patient characteristics associated with LOS and patient satisfaction after total hip and knee replacement surgery. Between September 2003 and December 2005, 712 consecutive, unselected patients (440 women) with a mean age of 69 (31-91) years were admitted for hip and knee replacement surgery at our specialized fast-track joint replacement unit. Epidemiological, physical, and perioperative parameters were registered and correlated to LOS and patient satisfaction. 92% of the patients were discharged directly to their homes within 5 days, and 41% were discharged within 3 days. Age, sex, marital status, co-morbidity, preoperative use of walking aids, pre- and postoperative hemoglobin levels, the need for blood transfusion, ASA score, and time between surgery and mobilization, were all found to influence postoperative outcome in general, and LOS and patient satisfaction in particular. We identified several patient characteristics that influence postoperative outcome, LOS, and patient satisfaction in our series of consecutive fast-track joint replacement patients, enabling further attention to be paid to certain aspects of surgery and rehabilitation.
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            A clinical pathway to accelerate recovery after colonic resection.

            To investigate the feasibility of a 48-hour postoperative stay program after colonic resection. Postoperative hospital stay after colonic resection is usually 6 to 12 days, with a complication rate of 10% to 20%. Limiting factors for early recovery include stress-induced organ dysfunction, paralytic ileus, pain, and fatigue. It has been hypothesized that an accelerated multimodal rehabilitation program with optimal pain relief, stress reduction with regional anesthesia, early enteral nutrition, and early mobilization may enhance recovery and reduce the complication rate. Sixty consecutive patients undergoing elective colonic resection were prospectively studied using a well-defined postoperative care program including continuous thoracic epidural analgesia and enforced early mobilization and enteral nutrition, and a planned 48-hour postoperative hospital stay. Postoperative follow-up was scheduled at 8 and 30 days. Median age was 74 years, with 20 patients in ASA group III-IV. Normal gastrointestinal function (defecation) occurred within 48 hours in 57 patients, and the median hospital stay was 2 days, with 32 patients staying 2 days after surgery. There were no cardiopulmonary complications. The readmission rate was 15%, including two patients with anastomotic dehiscence (one treated conservatively, one with colostomy); other readmissions required only short-term observation. A multimodal rehabilitation program may significantly reduce the postoperative hospital stay in high-risk patients undergoing colonic resection. Such a program may also reduce postoperative ileus and cardiopulmonary complications. These results may have important implications for the care of patients after colonic surgery and in the future assessment of open versus laparoscopic colonic resection.
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              A protocol is not enough to implement an enhanced recovery programme for colorectal resection.

              Single-centre studies have suggested that enhanced recovery can be achieved with multimodal perioperative care protocols. This international observational study evaluated the implementation of an enhanced recovery programme in five European centres and examined the determinants affecting recovery and length of hospital stay. Four hundred and twenty-five consecutive patients undergoing elective open colorectal resection above the peritoneal reflection between January 2001 and January 2004 were enrolled in a protocol that defined multiple perioperative care elements. One centre had been developing multimodal perioperative care for 10 years, whereas the other four had previously undertaken traditional care. The case mix was similar between centres. Protocol compliance before and during the surgical procedure was high, but it was low in the immediate postoperative phase. Patients fulfilled predetermined recovery criteria a median of 3 days after operation but were actually discharged a median of 5 days after surgery. Delay in discharge and the development of major complications prolonged length of stay. Previous experience with fast-track surgery was associated with a shorter hospital stay. Functional recovery in 3 days after colorectal resection could be achieved in daily practice. A protocol is not enough to enable discharge of patients on the day of functional recovery; more experience and better organization of care may be required. Copyright (c) 2006 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Current Anaesthesia & Critical Care
                Current Anaesthesia & Critical Care
                Elsevier BV
                09537112
                June 2010
                June 2010
                : 21
                : 3
                : 114-120
                Article
                10.1016/j.cacc.2010.01.003
                © 2010

                http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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