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      Genome Size and Transposable Element Content as Determined by High-Throughput Sequencing in Maize and Zea luxurians

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          Abstract

          The genome of maize ( Zea mays ssp. mays) consists mostly of transposable elements (TEs) and varies in size among lines. This variation extends to other species in the genus Zea: although maize and Zea luxurians diverged only ∼140,000 years ago, their genomes differ in size by ∼50%. We used paired-end Illumina sequencing to evaluate the potential contribution of TEs to the genome size difference between these two species. We aligned the reads both to a filtered gene set and to an exemplar database of unique repeats representing 1,514 TE families; ∼85% of reads mapped against TE repeats in both species. The relative contribution of TE families to the B73 genome was highly correlated with previous estimates, suggesting that reliable estimates of TE content can be obtained from short high-throughput sequencing reads, even at low coverage. Because we used paired-end reads, we could assess whether a TE was near a gene by determining if one paired read mapped to a TE and the second read mapped to a gene. Using this method, Class 2 DNA elements were found significantly more often in genic regions than Class 1 RNA elements, but Class 1 elements were found more often near other TEs. Overall, we found that both Class 1 and 2 TE families account for ∼70% of the genome size difference between B73 and luxurians. Interestingly, the relative abundance of TE families was conserved between species ( r = 0.97), suggesting genome-wide control of TE content rather than family-specific effects.

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          Most cited references 55

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          The origins of genome complexity.

          Complete genomic sequences from diverse phylogenetic lineages reveal notable increases in genome complexity from prokaryotes to multicellular eukaryotes. The changes include gradual increases in gene number, resulting from the retention of duplicate genes, and more abrupt increases in the abundance of spliceosomal introns and mobile genetic elements. We argue that many of these modifications emerged passively in response to the long-term population-size reductions that accompanied increases in organism size. According to this model, much of the restructuring of eukaryotic genomes was initiated by nonadaptive processes, and this in turn provided novel substrates for the secondary evolution of phenotypic complexity by natural selection. The enormous long-term effective population sizes of prokaryotes may impose a substantial barrier to the evolution of complex genomes and morphologies.
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            SSAHA: a fast search method for large DNA databases.

            We describe an algorithm, SSAHA (Sequence Search and Alignment by Hashing Algorithm), for performing fast searches on databases containing multiple gigabases of DNA. Sequences in the database are preprocessed by breaking them into consecutive k-tuples of k contiguous bases and then using a hash table to store the position of each occurrence of each k-tuple. Searching for a query sequence in the database is done by obtaining from the hash table the "hits" for each k-tuple in the query sequence and then performing a sort on the results. We discuss the effect of the tuple length k on the search speed, memory usage, and sensitivity of the algorithm and present the results of computational experiments which show that SSAHA can be three to four orders of magnitude faster than BLAST or FASTA, while requiring less memory than suffix tree methods. The SSAHA algorithm is used for high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection and very large scale sequence assembly. Also, it provides Web-based sequence search facilities for Ensembl projects.
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              A single domestication for maize shown by multilocus microsatellite genotyping.

              There exists extraordinary morphological and genetic diversity among the maize landraces that have been developed by pre-Columbian cultivators. To explain this high level of diversity in maize, several authors have proposed that maize landraces were the products of multiple independent domestications from their wild relative (teosinte). We present phylogenetic analyses based on 264 individual plants, each genotyped at 99 microsatellites, that challenge the multiple-origins hypothesis. Instead, our results indicate that all maize arose from a single domestication in southern Mexico about 9,000 years ago. Our analyses also indicate that the oldest surviving maize types are those of the Mexican highlands with maize spreading from this region over the Americas along two major paths. Our phylogenetic work is consistent with a model based on the archaeological record suggesting that maize diversified in the highlands of Mexico before spreading to the lowlands. We also found only modest evidence for postdomestication gene flow from teosinte into maize.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Genome Biol Evol
                gbe
                gbe
                Genome Biology and Evolution
                Oxford University Press
                1759-6653
                2011
                04 February 2011
                2011
                04 February 2011
                : 3
                : 219-229
                Affiliations
                [1 ]CNRS, UMR de Génétique Végétale, INRA/CNRS/Univ Paris-Sud/AgroParisTech, Ferme du Moulon, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
                [2 ]Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UC Irvine
                [3 ]Department of Plant Sciences, UC Davis
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author: E-mail: rossibarra@ 123456ucdavis.edu .

                Associate editor: Michael Purugganan

                Article
                10.1093/gbe/evr008
                3068001
                21296765
                © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Research Articles

                Genetics

                genome size, transposable elements, effective population size, maize

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