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      Mouth rinsing with a carbohydrate solution does not influence cycle time trial performance in the heat.

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          Abstract

          Ten endurance-trained males were recruited to examine the possible role of carbohydrate (CHO) receptors in the mouth influencing exercise performance in the heat. Volunteers completed an incremental test to exhaustion to determine peak oxygen uptake, a familiarisation trial, followed by 2 experimental trials. Trials consisted of a 1-h time trial undertaken in a climatic chamber maintained at 30 °C, 60% relative humidity. Immediately before, and at regular intervals throughout exercise, subjects ingested a bolus of water and then were provided with either a placebo (PLA) or a 6.4% glucose (CHO) solution to rinse in the mouth for 10 s before being expectorated. There was no difference in total work done between the PLA and CHO trials (758.8 ± 149.0 kJ; 762.6 ± 141.1 kJ; P = 0.951). Pacing was also similar, with no differences in power output apparent during the experimental trials (P = 0.546). Core temperature (P = 0.615), heart rate (P = 0.505), ratings of perceived exertion (P = 0.181), and perceived thermal stress (P = 0.416) were not influenced by the nature of the intervention. Blood glucose concentrations were similar during the CHO and PLA trials (P = 0.117). In contrast to the findings of several studies undertaken in temperate conditions, the present investigation failed to support role of oral sensing of CHO in influencing performance during prolonged exercise in warm conditions.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Appl Physiol Nutr Metab
          Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquée, nutrition et métabolisme
          1715-5320
          1715-5312
          Sep 2014
          : 39
          : 9
          Affiliations
          [1 ] a School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, Loughborough University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK.
          Article
          10.1139/apnm-2013-0413
          25154896

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