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      Optimization of potassium for proper growth and physiological response of Houttuynia cordata Thunb.

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          Research highlights

          ▶ 1.28 mM potassium is favourable to the growth of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. ▶ High photosynthetic rate is due to increased chlorophyll and stable chloroplast. ▶ Stomatal conductance is limited by potassium supplies. ▶ Potassium starvation and high potassium reduce water content and root growth. ▶ Potassium starvation and high potassium cause oxidative stress.

          Abstract

          Houttuynia cordata Thunb. is an edible herb with a variety of pharmacological activities, but only limited information is available about its response towards potassium supplementation. Sterile plantlets were cultured in media with different potassium levels, and parameters related to growth, foliar potassium, water and chlorophyll contents, photosynthesis, transpiration, H 2O 2 contents and antioxidative enzyme activities were determined after a month. Results showed that 1.28 mM potassium was the optimum for H. cordata as highest values of dry weight, shoot height, root length and number were obtained at this concentration. The optimum potassium concentration resulted in the maximum net photosynthetic rate which could be associated with the highest chlorophyll content rather than limited stomatal conductance. The supply of surplus potassium resulted in higher content of foliar potassium, but negatively correlated with the biomass. Both potassium starvation (0 mM) and high potassium (>1.28 mM) could lead to water loss through high transpiration rate and low water absorption, respectively, and resulted in H 2O 2 accumulation and increased activities of catalase and peroxidase, which suggested induction of oxidative stress. Moreover, H. cordata showed the minimum of H 2O 2 content and the maximum of superoxide dismutase activity on 1.28 mM potassium, implying its role in inducing tolerance against oxidative stress.

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          Most cited references 46

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          Superoxide Dismutase and Stress Tolerance

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            How do plants respond to nutrient shortage by biomass allocation?

            Plants constantly sense the changes in their environment; when mineral elements are scarce, they often allocate a greater proportion of their biomass to the root system. This acclimatory response is a consequence of metabolic changes in the shoot and an adjustment of carbohydrate transport to the root. It has long been known that deficiencies of essential macronutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and magnesium) result in an accumulation of carbohydrates in leaves and roots, and modify the shoot-to-root biomass ratio. Here, we present an update on the effects of mineral deficiencies on the expression of genes involved in primary metabolism in the shoot, the evidence for increased carbohydrate concentrations and altered biomass allocation between shoot and root, and the consequences of these changes on the growth and morphology of the plant root system.
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              COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF A LOCALISED SUPPLY OF PHOSPHATE, NITRATE, AMMONIUM AND POTASSIUM ON THE GROWTH OF THE SEMINAL ROOT SYSTEM, AND THE SHOOT, IN BARLEY

               M. DREW (1975)
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Environ Exp Bot
                Environ. Exp. Bot
                Environmental and Experimental Botany
                Elsevier B.V.
                0098-8472
                0098-8472
                29 December 2010
                June 2011
                29 December 2010
                : 71
                : 2
                : 292-297
                Affiliations
                [a ]Agronomy College, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya’an 625014, PR China
                [b ]Division of Plant Breeding & Genetics, Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences & Technology of Kashmir, Jammu & Kashmir, India
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author. Tel.: +86 835 2882108; fax: +86 835 2882336. ewuwei@ 123456gmail.com ewuwei@ 123456sicau.edu.cn
                [1]

                Both authors contributed equally to this work.

                Article
                S0098-8472(10)00289-3
                10.1016/j.envexpbot.2010.12.015
                7112314
                Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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