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      The role of coworker and supervisor support on job burnout and job satisfaction

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      Journal of Advances in Management Research
      Emerald

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          This study investigates the role of coworker and supervisor support on three aspects of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, perceived lack of personal accomplishment) and job satisfaction. The authors argue that different sources of social support at work can influence these three aspects of burnout differently.

          Design/methodology/approach

          Questionnaires were delivered to supervisors of each campus department at two state universities in South Texas asking them to encourage their employees to complete the survey. The sample consisted of 174 personnel.

          Findings

          The results show that coworker support was negatively associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalization but not with perceived lack of personal accomplishment while supervisor support was negatively associated with all aspects of burnout. The analysis also confirmed the direct and indirect effects of coworker and supervisor support on job satisfaction.

          Practical implications

          Due to the detrimental consequences of burnout to employee satisfaction, organizations need to make sure that employees receive sufficient support from their coworkers and supervisors to avoid this burnout problem.

          Originality/value

          Even though the role of social support on job burnout has been previously investigated, existing studies tended to combine three dimensions of burnout into a single measure. Using an aggregated measure of burnout as an outcome variable can limit our understanding about the role that social support plays on each individual dimension of burnout. By employing burnout as a multidimensional construct, the present study can determine whether coworker support and supervisor support can have a different impact on each of the three dimensions of burnout.

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          Most cited references69

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          The moderator-mediator variable distinction in social psychological research: conceptual, strategic, and statistical considerations.

          In this article, we attempt to distinguish between the properties of moderator and mediator variables at a number of levels. First, we seek to make theorists and researchers aware of the importance of not using the terms moderator and mediator interchangeably by carefully elaborating, both conceptually and strategically, the many ways in which moderators and mediators differ. We then go beyond this largely pedagogical function and delineate the conceptual and strategic implications of making use of such distinctions with regard to a wide range of phenomena, including control and stress, attitudes, and personality traits. We also provide a specific compendium of analytic procedures appropriate for making the most effective use of the moderator and mediator distinction, both separately and in terms of a broader causal system that includes both moderators and mediators.
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            • Record: found
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            Evaluating Structural Equation Models with Unobservable Variables and Measurement Error

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              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              PLS-SEM: Indeed a Silver Bullet

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Advances in Management Research
                Emerald
                0972-7981
                0972-7981
                May 3 2016
                March 11 2016
                May 3 2016
                March 11 2016
                : 13
                : 1
                Article
                10.1108/JAMR-06-2014-0037
                dd2e9718-d8c3-49e4-9bb2-a160346fd03b
                © 2016

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