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Patient motion effects on the quantification of regional myocardial blood flow with dynamic PET imaging : Patient motion effects on regional myocardial blood flow

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Medical Physics

Wiley-Blackwell

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      ACC/AHA/ASNC guidelines for the clinical use of cardiac radionuclide imaging--executive summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines (ACC/AHA/ASNC Committee to Revise the 1995 Guidelines for the Clinical Use of Cardiac Radionuclide Imaging).

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        MRI-based nonrigid motion correction in simultaneous PET/MRI.

        Respiratory and cardiac motion is the most serious limitation to whole-body PET, resulting in spatial resolution close to 1 cm. Furthermore, motion-induced inconsistencies in the attenuation measurements often lead to significant artifacts in the reconstructed images. Gating can remove motion artifacts at the cost of increased noise. This paper presents an approach to respiratory motion correction using simultaneous PET/MRI to demonstrate initial results in phantoms, rabbits, and nonhuman primates and discusses the prospects for clinical application. Studies with a deformable phantom, a free-breathing primate, and rabbits implanted with radioactive beads were performed with simultaneous PET/MRI. Motion fields were estimated from concurrently acquired tagged MR images using 2 B-spline nonrigid image registration methods and incorporated into a PET list-mode ordered-subsets expectation maximization algorithm. Using the measured motion fields to transform both the emission data and the attenuation data, we could use all the coincidence data to reconstruct any phase of the respiratory cycle. We compared the resulting SNR and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) detection signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the motion-corrected reconstruction with the results obtained from standard gating and uncorrected studies. Motion correction virtually eliminated motion blur without reducing SNR, yielding images with SNR comparable to those obtained by gating with 5-8 times longer acquisitions in all studies. The CHO study in dynamic phantoms demonstrated a significant improvement (166%-276%) in lesion detection SNR with MRI-based motion correction as compared with gating (P < 0.001). This improvement was 43%-92% for large motion compared with lesion detection without motion correction (P < 0.001). CHO SNR in the rabbit studies confirmed these results. Tagged MRI motion correction in simultaneous PET/MRI significantly improves lesion detection compared with respiratory gating and no motion correction while reducing radiation dose. In vivo primate and rabbit studies confirmed the improvement in PET image quality and provide the rationale for evaluation in simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI clinical studies.
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          Simultaneous reconstruction of activity and attenuation for PET/MR.

          Medical investigations targeting a quantitative analysis of the position emission tomography (PET) images require the incorporation of additional knowledge about the photon attenuation distribution in the patient. Today, energy range adapted attenuation maps derived from computer tomography (CT) scans are used to effectively compensate for image quality degrading effects, such as attenuation and scatter. Replacing CT by magnetic resonance (MR) is considered as the next evolutionary step in the field of hybrid imaging systems. However, unlike CT, MR does not measure the photon attenuation and thus does not provide an easy access to this valuable information. Hence, many research groups currently investigate different technologies for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). Typically, these approaches are based on techniques such as special acquisition sequences (alone or in combination with subsequent image processing), anatomical atlas registration, or pattern recognition techniques using a data base of MR and corresponding CT images. We propose a generic iterative reconstruction approach to simultaneously estimate the local tracer concentration and the attenuation distribution using the segmented MR image as anatomical reference. Instead of applying predefined attenuation values to specific anatomical regions or tissue types, the gamma attenuation at 511 keV is determined from the PET emission data. In particular, our approach uses a maximum-likelihood estimation for the activity and a gradient-ascent based algorithm for the attenuation distribution. The adverse effects of scattered and accidental gamma coincidences on the quantitative accuracy of PET, as well as artifacts caused by the inherent crosstalk between activity and attenuation estimation are efficiently reduced using enhanced decay event localization provided by time-of-flight PET, accurate correction for accidental coincidences, and a reduced number of unknown attenuation coefficients. First results achieved with measured whole body PET data and reference segmentation from CT showed an absolute mean difference of 0.005 cm⁻¹ (< 20%) in the lungs, 0.0009 cm⁻¹ (< 2%) in case of fat, and 0.0015 cm⁻¹ (< 2%) for muscles and blood. The proposed method indicates a robust and reliable alternative to other MR-AC approaches targeting patient specific quantitative analysis in time-of-flight PET/MR.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Medical Physics
            Med. Phys.
            Wiley-Blackwell
            00942405
            April 2016
            March 22 2016
            : 43
            : 4
            : 1829-1840
            10.1118/1.4943565
            © 2016

            http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1

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