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Patient motion effects on the quantification of regional myocardial blood flow with dynamic PET imaging : Patient motion effects on regional myocardial blood flow

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Medical Physics

Wiley-Blackwell

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      ACC/AHA/ASNC guidelines for the clinical use of cardiac radionuclide imaging--executive summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines (ACC/AHA/ASNC Committee to Revise the 1995 Guidelines for the Clinical Use of Cardiac Radionuclide Imaging).

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        MRI-based nonrigid motion correction in simultaneous PET/MRI.

        Respiratory and cardiac motion is the most serious limitation to whole-body PET, resulting in spatial resolution close to 1 cm. Furthermore, motion-induced inconsistencies in the attenuation measurements often lead to significant artifacts in the reconstructed images. Gating can remove motion artifacts at the cost of increased noise. This paper presents an approach to respiratory motion correction using simultaneous PET/MRI to demonstrate initial results in phantoms, rabbits, and nonhuman primates and discusses the prospects for clinical application. Studies with a deformable phantom, a free-breathing primate, and rabbits implanted with radioactive beads were performed with simultaneous PET/MRI. Motion fields were estimated from concurrently acquired tagged MR images using 2 B-spline nonrigid image registration methods and incorporated into a PET list-mode ordered-subsets expectation maximization algorithm. Using the measured motion fields to transform both the emission data and the attenuation data, we could use all the coincidence data to reconstruct any phase of the respiratory cycle. We compared the resulting SNR and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) detection signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the motion-corrected reconstruction with the results obtained from standard gating and uncorrected studies. Motion correction virtually eliminated motion blur without reducing SNR, yielding images with SNR comparable to those obtained by gating with 5-8 times longer acquisitions in all studies. The CHO study in dynamic phantoms demonstrated a significant improvement (166%-276%) in lesion detection SNR with MRI-based motion correction as compared with gating (P < 0.001). This improvement was 43%-92% for large motion compared with lesion detection without motion correction (P < 0.001). CHO SNR in the rabbit studies confirmed these results. Tagged MRI motion correction in simultaneous PET/MRI significantly improves lesion detection compared with respiratory gating and no motion correction while reducing radiation dose. In vivo primate and rabbit studies confirmed the improvement in PET image quality and provide the rationale for evaluation in simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI clinical studies.
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          Simultaneous reconstruction of activity and attenuation in time-of-flight PET.

          In positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT), attenuation correction is necessary for quantitative reconstruction of the tracer distribution. Previously, several attempts have been made to estimate the attenuation coefficients from emission data only. These attempts had limited success, because the problem does not have a unique solution, and severe and persistent "cross-talk" between the estimated activity and attenuation distributions was observed. In this paper, we show that the availability of time-of-flight (TOF) information eliminates the cross-talk problem by destroying symmetries in the associated Fisher information matrix. We propose a maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction algorithm for jointly estimating the attenuation and activity distributions from TOF PET data. The performance of the algorithm is studied with 2-D simulations, and further illustrated with phantom experiments and with a patient scan. The estimated attenuation image is robust to noise, and does not suffer from the cross-talk that was observed in non-TOF PET. However, some constraining is still mandatory, because the TOF data determine the attenuation sinogram only up to a constant offset.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Medical Physics
            Med. Phys.
            Wiley-Blackwell
            00942405
            April 2016
            March 22 2016
            : 43
            : 4
            : 1829-1840
            10.1118/1.4943565
            © 2016

            http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1

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