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      Interactions among Sustainable Development Goals: Knowledge for identifying multipliers and virtuous cycles

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          Most cited references 24

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          Network analysis in the social sciences.

          Over the past decade, there has been an explosion of interest in network research across the physical and social sciences. For social scientists, the theory of networks has been a gold mine, yielding explanations for social phenomena in a wide variety of disciplines from psychology to economics. Here, we review the kinds of things that social scientists have tried to explain using social network analysis and provide a nutshell description of the basic assumptions, goals, and explanatory mechanisms prevalent in the field. We hope to contribute to a dialogue among researchers from across the physical and social sciences who share a common interest in understanding the antecedents and consequences of network phenomena.
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            Is Open Access

            Integration: the key to implementing the Sustainable Development Goals

            On 25 September, 2015, world leaders met at the United Nations in New York, where they adopted the Sustainable Development Goals. These 17 goals and 169 targets set out an agenda for sustainable development for all nations that embraces economic growth, social inclusion, and environmental protection. Now, the agenda moves from agreeing the goals to implementing and ultimately achieving them. Across the goals, 42 targets focus on means of implementation, and the final goal, Goal 17, is entirely devoted to means of implementation. However, these implementation targets are largely silent about interlinkages and interdependencies among goals. This leaves open the possibility of perverse outcomes and unrealised synergies. We demonstrate that there must be greater attention on interlinkages in three areas: across sectors (e.g., finance, agriculture, energy, and transport), across societal actors (local authorities, government agencies, private sector, and civil society), and between and among low, medium and high income countries. Drawing on a global sustainability science and practice perspective, we provide seven recommendations to improve these interlinkages at both global and national levels, in relation to the UN’s categories of means of implementation: finance, technology, capacity building, trade, policy coherence, partnerships, and, finally, data, monitoring and accountability. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11625-016-0383-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
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              An integrated framework for sustainable development goals

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Sustainable Development
                Sustainable Development
                Wiley
                0968-0802
                1099-1719
                June 04 2020
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Centre for Development and Environment (CDE)University of Bern Bern Switzerland
                [2 ]Department of Governance and Technology for SustainabilityUniversity of Twente Enschede The Netherlands
                [3 ]Institute of Political ScienceUniversity of Bern Bern Switzerland
                [4 ]Department of Environmental Social SciencesEawag Dübendorf Switzerland
                [5 ]Institute of GeographyUniversity of Bern Bern Switzerland
                Article
                10.1002/sd.2073
                © 2020

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