Blog
About

27
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The effects of food advertising and cognitive load on food choices

      , 1 , 1

      BMC Public Health

      BioMed Central

      Behavioral economics, Advertising, Obesity, Food choice, Cognitive load

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Advertising has been implicated in the declining quality of the American diet, but much of the research has been conducted with children rather than adults. This study tested the effects of televised food advertising on adult food choice.

          Methods

          Participants (N = 351) were randomized into one of 4 experimental conditions: exposure to food advertising vs. exposure to non-food advertising, and within each of these groups, exposure to a task that was either cognitively demanding or not cognitively demanding. The number of unhealthy snacks chosen was subsequently measured, along with total calories of the snacks chosen.

          Results

          Those exposed to food advertising chose 28% more unhealthy snacks than those exposed to non-food-advertising (95% CI: 7% - 53%), with a total caloric value that was 65 kcal higher (95% CI: 10-121). The effect of advertising was not significant among those assigned to the low-cognitive-load group, but was large and significant among those assigned to the high-cognitive-load group: 43% more unhealthy snacks (95% CI: 11% - 85%) and 94 more total calories (95% CI: 19-169).

          Conclusions

          Televised food advertising has strong effects on individual food choice, and these effects are magnified when individuals are cognitively occupied by other tasks.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 31

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Heart and Mind in Conflict: the Interplay of Affect and Cognition in Consumer Decision Making

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Yielding to Temptation: Self‐Control Failure, Impulsive Purchasing, and Consumer Behavior

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The contribution of expanding portion sizes to the US obesity epidemic.

              Because larger food portions could be contributing to the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity, this study was designed to weigh samples of marketplace foods, identify historical changes in the sizes of those foods, and compare current portions with federal standards. We obtained information about current portions from manufacturers or from direct weighing; we obtained information about past portions from manufacturers or contemporary publications. Marketplace food portions have increased in size and now exceed federal standards. Portion sizes began to grow in the 1970s, rose sharply in the 1980s, and have continued in parallel with increasing body weights. Because energy content increases with portion size, educational and other public health efforts to address obesity should focus on the need for people to consume smaller portions.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                BMC Public Health
                BMC Public Health
                BMC Public Health
                BioMed Central
                1471-2458
                2014
                10 April 2014
                : 14
                : 342
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Health Policy & Management, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA
                Article
                1471-2458-14-342
                10.1186/1471-2458-14-342
                4021209
                24721289
                Copyright © 2014 Zimmerman and Shimoga; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                Categories
                Research Article

                Public health

                behavioral economics, cognitive load, food choice, obesity, advertising

                Comments

                Comment on this article