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      3D printed microfluidic devices: enablers and barriers.

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          Abstract

          3D printing has the potential to significantly change the field of microfluidics. The ability to fabricate a complete microfluidic device in a single step from a computer model has obvious attractions, but it is the ability to create truly three dimensional structures that will provide new microfluidic capability that is challenging, if not impossible to make with existing approaches. This critical review covers the current state of 3D printing for microfluidics, focusing on the four most frequently used printing approaches: inkjet (i3DP), stereolithography (SLA), two photon polymerisation (2PP) and extrusion printing (focusing on fused deposition modeling). It discusses current achievements and limitations, and opportunities for advancement to reach 3D printing's full potential.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Lab Chip
          Lab on a chip
          Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
          1473-0189
          1473-0189
          May 24 2016
          : 16
          : 11
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Australian Centre for Research on Separation Sciences (ACROSS), School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, 7001, TAS, Australia. mcb@utas.edu.au and ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES), School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, 7001, TAS, Australia.
          [2 ] ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES), School of Physical Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, 7001, TAS, Australia.
          [3 ] Australian Centre for Research on Separation Sciences (ACROSS), Pharmacy School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, 7001, TAS, Australia.
          Article
          10.1039/c6lc00284f
          27146365

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