5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Effects of osmotic and thermal shock on the invasive aquatic mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum: mortality and physiology under stressful conditions

      ,

      NeoBiota

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Invasive freshwater species, such as the exotic mollusc Potamopyrgus antipodarum (New Zealand mudsnail), can frequently survive under harsh conditions, including brackish and hypoxic environments. We experimentally assessed the effects of osmotic (0, 10, 20, 25 and 30 psu) and thermal (20 °C) shock on mortality, activity and physiology of P. antipodarum collected at Capitol Lake, Olympia, Washington, USA, during winter and spring seasons when environmental temperature was 5 and 10 °C respectively. We measured standard metabolic rate and enzymatic activities (malate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, alanopine dehydrogenase) in snails after a 10-day acclimation period at high salinity. Significantly higher mortalities were observed at higher salinities; the strongest effects occurred on snails collected at the end of winter, and exposed to 30 psu and 20 °C (100% mortality in 3 days). When snails were collected during the spring, 100% mortality was observed after 40 days at 30 psu and 20 °C. Standard metabolic rates were significantly lower when snails were exposed to salinities of 25 and 30 psu, even after 10 days of acclimation. Enzymatic activities showed small but significant declines after 10 days at 30 psu reflecting the declines observed in overall metabolism. The physiological tolerances to temperature and salinity displayed by this population of P. antipodarum make its eradication from Capital Lake difficult to achieve.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 36

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Ecology. Physiology and climate change.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Environmental and Economic Costs of Nonindigenous Species in the United States

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The physiology of global change: linking patterns to mechanisms.

              Global change includes alterations in ocean temperature, oxygen availability, salinity, and pH, abiotic variables with strong and interacting influences on the physiology of all taxa. Physiological stresses resulting from changes in these four variables may cause broad biogeographic shifts as well as localized changes in distribution in mosaic habitats. To elucidate these causal linkages, I address the following questions: What types of physiological limitations can alter species' distributions and, in cases of extreme stress, cause extinctions? Which species are most threatened by these physiological challenges--and why? How do contents of genomes establish capacities to respond to global change, notably in the case of species that have evolved in highly stable habitats? How fully can phenotypic acclimatization offset abiotic stress? Can physiological measurements, including new molecular ("-omic") approaches, provide indices of the degree of sublethal stress an organism experiences? And can physiological evolution keep pace with global change?
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                NeoBiota
                NB
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2488
                1619-0033
                January 09 2020
                January 09 2020
                : 54
                : 1-22
                Article
                10.3897/neobiota.54.39465
                © 2020

                Comments

                Comment on this article