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Effectiveness of high speed instrument and air abrasion on different dental substrates

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      Abstract

      The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of high speed (HS) and air abrasion (AA) instruments on groups of teeth (deciduous, permanent, bovine), in terms of preparation time, topography and presence of smear layer. Each group consisted of 5 teeth that had their buccal/lingual surfaces prepared by using either HS or AA. All procedures were standardized and timed. The teeth were then sectioned and prepared for evaluation of both the topography and the presence of smear layer by scanning electron microscopy. As regards preparation time, HS yielded preparations 1.5 times quicker than AA did on the three types of dental substrates (Wilcoxon test, p < 0.05). In both techniques (Kruskal-Wallis Test, p < 0.05) the preparation time was influenced by the dental substrate, particularly in deciduous teeth (Mann-Whitney test with Bonferoni's correction, p < 0.017), which required a longer preparation time. In the descriptive analysis of the topography, no difference was found between the substrates. Nonetheless, the different instruments used determined distinctive topographies. Both techniques produced a smear layer (χ2 McNemar, p > 0.05) in all substrates, but with different formations. In conclusion, the HS instrument was found to be more rapid than the AA. No difference was found between the three dental substrates as regards both the topography and the presence of smear layer. The differences found in the present study were only in relation to the effects of each instrument used.

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      Most cited references 27

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      Smear layer: physiological considerations.

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        Caries removal techniques and instrumentation: a review.

        The invention of rotary instruments not only improved the speed of caries removal but also the destruction of sound tooth substance. Hence, as early as the 1950s, there were attempts to develop a less invasive technique, such as the air-abrasive and ultrasonic technique, for the purpose of caries removal. The proposed use of air-polishing was published in the early 1980s. Subsequent better understanding of the carious process saw the introduction of the enzyme technique in the late 1980s. Other techniques, such as chemomechanical caries removal and laser systems, have also been attempted and researched during the last four decades to minimise the unnecessary removal of sound tooth substance, although these and other techniques reviewed in this article have not yet superseded the use of rotary instruments. Furthermore, the concept of micro-cavity preparation developed in recent years and the introduction of acid-etch techniques, resin bonding and the use of glass-ionomer cements have also revolutionised the principles of cavity preparation in conservative dentistry. This article reviews the development of these various caries removal techniques and instrumentation and the evolutionary philosophies of cavity preparation promulgated over the last century or so.
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          Evaluation of cutting patterns produced in primary teeth by an air-abrasion system.

          The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of tip diameter, nozzle distance, and application time of an air-abrasion system for cavity preparation on the enamel of primary teeth. Forty exfoliated primary teeth were air abraded with a microabrasion machine used with a handpiece with an 80-degree-angle nozzle, 50-micron abrasive particle size, and 80-psi air pressure. The effects of 0.38- or 0.48-mm inner tip diameter, 2- or 5-mm distance from tip to tooth surface, and 15 or 30 seconds of application time on cutting efficiency were evaluated. Cutting width and depth were analyzed and measured from scanning electron micrographs. Statistical analysis revealed that the width of the cuts was significantly greater when the tip distance was increased. Significantly deeper cavities were produced by a tip with a 0.48-mm inner diameter. The application time did not influence the cuts. The cutting patterns found in this study suggest that precise removal of enamel in primary teeth is best accomplished when a tip with a 0.38-mm inner diameter is used at a 2-mm distance.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ] Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Brazil
            Contributors
            Role: ND
            Role: ND
            Role: ND
            Role: ND
            Journal
            bor
            Brazilian Oral Research
            Braz. oral res.
            Sociedade Brasileira de Pesquisa Odontológica - SBPqO (São Paulo )
            1807-3107
            September 2008
            : 22
            : 3
            : 235-241
            S1806-83242008000300008 10.1590/S1806-83242008000300008

            http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

            Product
            Product Information: SciELO Brazil
            Categories
            DENTISTRY, ORAL SURGERY & MEDICINE

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