73
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
4 collections
    1
    shares

      To submit to this journal, please click here

      Your research makes an impact. Our goal is to share all excellent science as broadly and effectively as possible to accelerate discovery and lead a transformation in research communication.

      Learn more and submit here

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Mental health, a neglected aftershock of climate disasters

      ,
      PLOS Climate
      Public Library of Science (PLoS)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references9

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          The Impact of Climate Change on Mental Health: A Systematic Descriptive Review

          Background Climate change is one of the great challenges of our time. The consequences of climate change on exposed biological subjects, as well as on vulnerable societies, are a concern for the entire scientific community. Rising temperatures, heat waves, floods, tornadoes, hurricanes, droughts, fires, loss of forest, and glaciers, along with disappearance of rivers and desertification, can directly and indirectly cause human pathologies that are physical and mental. However, there is a clear lack in psychiatric studies on mental disorders linked to climate change. Methods Literature available on PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library until end of June 2019 were reviewed. The total number of articles and association reports was 445. From these, 163 were selected. We looked for the association between classical psychiatric disorders such as anxiety schizophrenia, mood disorder and depression, suicide, aggressive behaviors, despair for the loss of usual landscape, and phenomena related to climate change and extreme weather. Review of literature was then divided into specific areas: the course of change in mental health, temperature, water, air pollution, drought, as well as the exposure of certain groups and critical psychological adaptations. Results Climate change has an impact on a large part of the population, in different geographical areas and with different types of threats to public health. However, the delay in studies on climate change and mental health consequences is an important aspect. Lack of literature is perhaps due to the complexity and novelty of this issue. It has been shown that climate change acts on mental health with different timing. The phenomenology of the effects of climate change differs greatly—some mental disorders are common and others more specific in relation to atypical climatic conditions. Moreover, climate change also affects different population groups who are directly exposed and more vulnerable in their geographical conditions, as well as a lack of access to resources, information, and protection. Perhaps it is also worth underlining that in some papers the connection between climatic events and mental disorders was described through the introduction of new terms, coined only recently: ecoanxiety, ecoguilt, ecopsychology, ecological grief, solastalgia, biospheric concern, etc. Conclusions The effects of climate change can be direct or indirect, short-term or long-term. Acute events can act through mechanisms similar to that of traumatic stress, leading to well-understood psychopathological patterns. In addition, the consequences of exposure to extreme or prolonged weather-related events can also be delayed, encompassing disorders such as posttraumatic stress, or even transmitted to later generations.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The Effect of Heat Waves on Mental Health in a Temperate Australian City

            Objective The goal of this study was to identify mental, behavioral, and cognitive disorders that may be triggered or exacerbated during heat waves, predisposing individuals to heat-related morbidity and mortality. Design Using health outcome data from Adelaide, South Australia, for 1993–2006, we estimated the effect of heat waves on hospital admissions and mortalities attributed to mental, behavioral, and cognitive disorders. We analyzed data using Poisson regression accounting for overdispersion and controlling for season and long-term trend, and we performed threshold analysis using hockey stick regression. Results Above a threshold of 26.7°C, we observed a positive association between ambient temperature and hospital admissions for mental and behavioral disorders. Compared with non–heat-wave periods, hospital admissions increased by 7.3% during heat waves. Specific illnesses for which admissions increased included organic illnesses, including symptomatic mental disorders; dementia; mood (affective) disorders; neurotic, stress related, and somatoform disorders; disorders of psychological development; and senility. Mortalities attributed to mental and behavioral disorders increased during heat waves in the 65- to 74-year age group and in persons with schizophrenia, schizotypal, and delusional disorders. Dementia deaths increased in those up to 65 years of age. Conclusion Our results suggest that episodes of extreme heat pose a salient risk to the health and well-being of the mentally ill. Relevance to Clinical or Professional Practice: Improvements in the management and care of the mentally ill need to be addressed to avoid an increase in psychiatric morbidity and mortality as heat waves become more frequent.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Disaster and its impact on mental health: A narrative review

              The purpose of this study is to understand the linkages between disaster and its impact on mental health. To fulfil this objective, an attempt has been made to examine the existing qualitative literature on disaster and mental health. In this paper, disaster and mental health as a concept has been used in a holistic sense. Based on the review of literature, the following broad themes have been identified: natural disaster and its impact on mental health, man-made disaster and its effect on mental health, effects of industrial disaster on mental health. It examines the post-disaster behavioural and psychological symptoms associated with an impairment in functioning. By this review, various protective factors, including resilience and other coping strategies which amplified the individual's capacity while encountering negative situations, have been identified. The effectiveness of post-disaster intervention techniques is also highlighted. Better preparedness and community empowerment can improve the condition of the vulnerable population affected by the disaster. Thus, efforts should be given for holistic rehabilitation of the affected population.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                PLOS Climate
                PLOS Clim
                Public Library of Science (PLoS)
                2767-3200
                May 4 2022
                May 4 2022
                : 1
                : 5
                : e0000031
                Article
                10.1371/journal.pclm.0000031
                df45d39f-8e4c-4ab9-a564-fc88aa55b685
                © 2022

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History

                Environmental change,Public health
                Environmental change, Public health

                Comments

                Comment on this article