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      The use of digital storytelling of patients’ stories as an approach to translating knowledge: a scoping review

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          Abstract

          Background

          A growing interest has centered on digital storytelling in health research, described as a multi-media presentation of a story using technology. The use of digital storytelling in knowledge translation (KT) is emerging as technology advances in healthcare to address the challenging tasks of disseminating and transferring knowledge to key stakeholders. We conducted a scoping review of the literature available on the use of patient digital storytelling as a tool in KT interventions.

          Methods

          We followed by Arksey and O’Malley (Int J Soc Res Methodol 8(1):19–32, 2005), and Levac et al. (Implement Sci 5(1):69, 2010) recommended steps for scoping reviews. Search strategies were conducted for electronic databases (Medline, CINAHL, Web of Science, ProQuest dissertations and theses global, Clinicaltrials.gov and Psychinfo). The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for scoping reviews (PRISMA-ScR) was used to report the review process.

          Results

          Of 4656 citations retrieved, 114 full texts were reviewed, and twenty-one articles included in the review. Included studies were from nine countries and focused on an array of physical and mental health conditions. A broad range of interpretations of digital storytelling and a variety of KT interventions were identified. Digital storytelling was predominately defined as a story in multi-media form, presented as a video, for selective or public viewing and used as educational material for healthcare professionals, patients and families.

          Conclusion

          Using digital storytelling as a tool in KT interventions can contribute to shared decision-making in healthcare and increase awareness in patients’ health related experiences. Concerns centered on the accuracy and reliability of some of the information available online and the impact of digital storytelling on knowledge action and implementation.

          Supplementary Information

          The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1186/s40900-021-00305-x.

          Plain English summary

          Digital storytelling is a multi-media presentation of a story, often in the form of a narrated video. The use of digital storytelling of patient experiences with healthcare has gained attention in recent years, as a tool for sharing and understanding information among patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals and policy makers. A summary of the findings reported in studies looking at digital storytelling as a way of sharing information in healthcare is needed.

          We searched literature that included the use of digital storytelling of patients’ healthcare experiences as a means of sharing and translating information, also referred to as knowledge translation or knowledge mobilization. There were 21 studies found from nine countries that used digital stories to look at experiences related to different physical and mental health conditions. A broad range of interpretations of digital storytelling and a variety of knowledge translation approaches were identified. The most common use of patients’ digital stories was educational material for healthcare professionals and other patients.

          Using digital storytelling to translate knowledge can contribute to patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals and policy makers sharing the best available evidence when faced with making a health decision. Digital storytelling can help us understand patients’ health related experiences. Further work is needed to test the accuracy and reliability of some online information and how to best measure the impact of digital storytelling on knowledge translation activities.

          Supplementary Information

          The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1186/s40900-021-00305-x.

          Related collections

          Most cited references48

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          PRISMA Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR): Checklist and Explanation

          Scoping reviews, a type of knowledge synthesis, follow a systematic approach to map evidence on a topic and identify main concepts, theories, sources, and knowledge gaps. Although more scoping reviews are being done, their methodological and reporting quality need improvement. This document presents the PRISMA-ScR (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews) checklist and explanation. The checklist was developed by a 24-member expert panel and 2 research leads following published guidance from the EQUATOR (Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research) Network. The final checklist contains 20 essential reporting items and 2 optional items. The authors provide a rationale and an example of good reporting for each item. The intent of the PRISMA-ScR is to help readers (including researchers, publishers, commissioners, policymakers, health care providers, guideline developers, and patients or consumers) develop a greater understanding of relevant terminology, core concepts, and key items to report for scoping reviews.
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            The Measurement of Observer Agreement for Categorical Data

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              Scoping studies: towards a methodological framework

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                cajones@ualberta.ca
                Journal
                Res Involv Engagem
                Res Involv Engagem
                Research Involvement and Engagement
                BioMed Central (London )
                2056-7529
                28 August 2021
                28 August 2021
                2021
                : 7
                : 58
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.17089.37, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, , University of Alberta, ; Edmonton, AB T6G 2G4 Canada
                [2 ]GRID grid.17089.37, Department Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, , University of Alberta, ; Edmonton, AB T6G 2G4 Canada
                [3 ]GRID grid.17089.37, Department Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, , University of Alberta, ; Edmonton, AB T6G 2G4 Canada
                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3952-3234
                Article
                305
                10.1186/s40900-021-00305-x
                8403386
                34454604
                df58464d-2693-45a4-b841-63c9f4d6aaa4
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Open AccessThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

                History
                : 11 March 2021
                : 6 August 2021
                Categories
                Research Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2021

                narrative medicine,digital storytelling,knowledge translation tools,health research,shared decision-making

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