11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Preclinical evaluation of VAX-IP, a novel bacterial minicell-based biopharmaceutical for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The development of new therapies that can prevent recurrence and progression of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer remains an unmet clinical need. The continued cost of monitoring and treatment of recurrent disease, along with its high prevalence and incidence rate, is a strain on healthcare economics worldwide. The current work describes the characterization and pharmacological evaluation of VAX-IP as a novel bacterial minicell-based biopharmaceutical agent undergoing development for the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer and other oncology indications. VAX-IP minicells selectively target two oncology-associated integrin heterodimer subtypes to deliver a unique bacterial cytolysin protein toxin, perfringolysin O, specifically to cancer cells, rapidly killing integrin-expressing murine and human urothelial cell carcinoma cells with a unique tumorlytic mechanism. The in vivo pharmacological evaluation of VAX-IP minicells as a single agent administered intravesically in two clinically relevant variations of a syngeneic orthotopic model of superficial bladder cancer results in a significant survival advantage with 28.6% ( P = 0.001) and 16.7% ( P = 0.003) of animals surviving after early or late treatment initiation, respectively. The results of these preclinical studies warrant further nonclinical and eventual clinical investigation in underserved nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer patient populations where complete cures are achievable.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 43

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Guideline for the management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (stages Ta, T1, and Tis): 2007 update.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Incidence and treatment of complications of bacillus Calmette-Guerin intravesical therapy in superficial bladder cancer.

            Intravesical therapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has proved to be more effective in the prophylaxis and treatment of superficial bladder tumors and carcinoma in situ than most chemotherapeutic agents. Compared to intravesical chemotherapy, instillations with BCG provoke more local and systemic reactions. In addition to the commonly induced granulomatous inflammatory changes in the bladder, which produce irritative symptoms, this therapy may cause systemic side effects varying from mild malaise and fever to, in rare instances, life-threatening or fatal sepsis. We report the incidence and varieties of toxicities in 2,602 patients treated with intravesical BCG. Side effects are classified according to local and systemic toxicity. Treatment options vary according to the severity of toxicity from delaying or withholding instillations to treatment with antituberculous drugs for up to 6 months. In general, 95% of the patients have no serious side effects. Recognition of risk factors, particularly traumatic catheterization or concurrent cystitis, that result in systemic BCG absorption, as well as the prompt and appropriate treatment of early side effects should significantly decrease the incidence of severe toxicity.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Identification of invasin: a protein that allows enteric bacteria to penetrate cultured mammalian cells.

              Bacterial strains harboring the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis inv locus were analyzed in order to investigate the mechanism of host cell penetration by an invasive pathogen. The inv locus was found to be necessary for Y. pseudotuberculosis to enter HEp-2 cells and sufficient to convert E. coli into a microorganism able to penetrate cultured cells. Both E. coli and Y. pseudotuberculosis strains harboring inv mutations were defective for entry into HEp-2 cells. Furthermore, molecular clones containing inv, and little additional DNA, converted E. coli into a microorganism that was indistinguishable from the parental Yersinia strain with regard to the entry of cultured cells. Data from in vitro protein synthesis indicated that a 103 kd protein was synthesized from inv, saturating the coding capacity of the locus. The nucleotide sequence shows an open reading frame corresponding to a protein of similar size. This protein, called invasin, is necessary for the microorganisms to penetrate HEp-2 cells, and is compartmentalized on the outer surface of the bacterium.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Mol Ther Oncolytics
                Mol Ther Oncolytics
                Molecular Therapy Oncolytics
                Nature Publishing Group
                2372-7705
                16 March 2016
                2016
                : 3
                : 16004
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Vaxiion Therapeutics , San Diego, California, USA
                [2 ]Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Tulane University , New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
                Author notes
                Article
                mto20164
                10.1038/mto.2016.4
                4824562
                27119118
                Copyright © 2016 Official journal of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article