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      Avian Influenza H5N1 in Naturally Infected Domestic Cat

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          Abstract

          We report H5N1 virus infection in a domestic cat infected by eating a pigeon carcass. The virus isolated from the pigeon and the cat showed the same cluster as the viruses obtained during the outbreak in Thailand. Since cats are common house pets, concern regarding disease transmission to humans exists.

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          Avian H5N1 influenza in cats.

          During the 2003 to 2004 outbreak of avian influenza A (H5N1) virus in Asia, there were anecdotal reports of fatal infection in domestic cats, although this species is considered resistant to influenza. We experimentally inoculated cats with H5N1 virus intratracheally and by feeding them virus-infected chickens. The cats excreted virus, developed severe diffuse alveolar damage, and transmitted virus to sentinel cats. These results show that domestic cats are at risk of disease or death from H5N1 virus, can be infected by horizontal transmission, and may play a role in the epidemiology of this virus.
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            Avian Influenza H5N1 in Tigers and Leopards

            Influenza virus is not known to affect wild felids. We demonstrate that avian influenza A (H5N1) virus caused severe pneumonia in tigers and leopards that fed on infected poultry carcasses. This finding extends the host range of influenza virus and has implications for influenza virus epidemiology and wildlife conservation.
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              Probable Tiger-to-Tiger Transmission of Avian Influenza H5N1

              During the second outbreak of avian influenza H5N1 in Thailand, probable horizontal transmission among tigers was demonstrated in the tiger zoo. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of those viruses showed no differences from the first isolate obtained in January 2004. This finding has implications for influenza virus epidemiology and pathogenicity in mammals.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Emerg Infect Dis
                EID
                Emerging Infectious Diseases
                Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
                1080-6040
                1080-6059
                April 2006
                : 12
                : 4
                : 681-683
                Affiliations
                [* ]Kasetsart University, Nakorn Pathom, Thailand;
                []Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Thailand;
                []Western Veterinary Research and Development Center, Chombueng, Ratchaburi, Thailand
                Author notes
                Address for correspondence: Yong Poovorawan, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, 1873 Rama IV Rd, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; fax: 66-2256-4911; email: Yong.P@ 123456Chula.ac.th
                Article
                05-1396
                10.3201/eid1204.051396
                3294706
                16704821
                df840292-0874-45e0-9fb6-27700c216d6e
                History
                Categories
                Dispatch
                Dispatch

                Infectious disease & Microbiology
                dispatch,avian influenza,h5n1,cat
                Infectious disease & Microbiology
                dispatch, avian influenza, h5n1, cat

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