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      Modern Classical Electrodynamics and Electromagnetic Radiation - Vacuum Field Theory Aspects

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          Abstract

          The work is devoted to studying some new classical electrodynamics models of interacting charged point particles and related with them physical aspects. Based on the vacuum field theory no-geometry approach, developed in \cite{BPT,BPT1}, the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian reformulations of some alternative classical electrodynamics models are devised. A problem closely related to the radiation reaction force is analyzed aiming to explain the Wheeler and Feynman reaction radiation mechanism, well known as the absorption radiation theory, and strongly dependent on the Mach type interaction of a charged point particle in an ambient vacuum electromagnetic medium. There are discussed some relationships between this problem and the one derived within the context of the vacuum field theory approach. The R. \ Feynman's \textquotedblleft heretical\textquotedblright\ approach \cite{Dy1,Dy2} to deriving the Lorentz force based Maxwell electromagnetic equations is also revisited, its complete legacy is argued both by means of the geometric considerations and its deep relation with the vacuum field theory approach devised before in \cite{BPT0,BPT1}. \ Being completely classical, we reanalyze the Feynman's derivation from the classical Lagrangian and Hamiltonian points of view \ and construct its nontrivial \ relativistic generalization compatible with the mentioned above vacuum field theory approach.

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          Quantum Mechanics helps in searching for a needle in a haystack

          Lov Grover (1997)
          Quantum mechanics can speed up a range of search applications over unsorted data. For example imagine a phone directory containing N names arranged in completely random order. To find someone's phone number with a probability of 50%, any classical algorithm (whether deterministic or probabilistic) will need to access the database a minimum of O(N) times. Quantum mechanical systems can be in a superposition of states and simultaneously examine multiple names. By properly adjusting the phases of various operations, successful computations reinforce each other while others interfere randomly. As a result, the desired phone number can be obtained in only O(sqrt(N)) accesses to the database.
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            The degree of knottedness of tangled vortex lines

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              Generalized Hamiltonian dynamics

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2012-04-25
                2013-02-16
                Article
                1204.6033
                df85427d-8481-4a8b-93bf-8ade52c7e554

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                History
                Custom metadata
                "Electromagnetiv waves", Edited by V. Zhurbenko, INTECH Publisger, 2011
                32 pages. arXiv admin note: substantial text overlap with arXiv:0909.4852 and 0810.3303
                gr-qc hep-th math-ph math.MP

                Mathematical physics,General relativity & Quantum cosmology,High energy & Particle physics,Mathematical & Computational physics

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