1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The bastard grunt Pomadasys incisus (Bowdich, 1825) (Teleostei: Haemulidae) in Cyprus (eastern Mediterranean Sea) - a late arrival or just a neglected species?

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Pomadasys incisus is a thermophilous coastal subtropical fish species belonging to the family Haemulidae . Originally described from Gambia, this species is widely distributed in the Eastern Atlantic from Galicia to South Africa. It has also been recorded in the Mediterranean Sea since 1840, presumably expanding its distribution in the next decades, although the species could have been already present in the basin, but simply overlooked until the mid XIX century. In this study, we first record P. incisus from Cyprus (eastern Mediterranean Sea), based on two opportunistic observations obtained through a citizen-science project and review the distribution of this species in the Mediterranean Sea. The present sighting raises the question on whether this species is a late arrival in the country or its presence has just been neglected until now. Based on present data, the most likely hypothesis is the latter one, with P. incisus occurring in low densities and being overlooked due to the absence of field studies. Whatever is true, some intrinsic or extrinsic factors may have played a role in limiting its spread or wide establishment in the above-mentioned country.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 43

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          The Biodiversity of the Mediterranean Sea: Estimates, Patterns, and Threats

          The Mediterranean Sea is a marine biodiversity hot spot. Here we combined an extensive literature analysis with expert opinions to update publicly available estimates of major taxa in this marine ecosystem and to revise and update several species lists. We also assessed overall spatial and temporal patterns of species diversity and identified major changes and threats. Our results listed approximately 17,000 marine species occurring in the Mediterranean Sea. However, our estimates of marine diversity are still incomplete as yet—undescribed species will be added in the future. Diversity for microbes is substantially underestimated, and the deep-sea areas and portions of the southern and eastern region are still poorly known. In addition, the invasion of alien species is a crucial factor that will continue to change the biodiversity of the Mediterranean, mainly in its eastern basin that can spread rapidly northwards and westwards due to the warming of the Mediterranean Sea. Spatial patterns showed a general decrease in biodiversity from northwestern to southeastern regions following a gradient of production, with some exceptions and caution due to gaps in our knowledge of the biota along the southern and eastern rims. Biodiversity was also generally higher in coastal areas and continental shelves, and decreases with depth. Temporal trends indicated that overexploitation and habitat loss have been the main human drivers of historical changes in biodiversity. At present, habitat loss and degradation, followed by fishing impacts, pollution, climate change, eutrophication, and the establishment of alien species are the most important threats and affect the greatest number of taxonomic groups. All these impacts are expected to grow in importance in the future, especially climate change and habitat degradation. The spatial identification of hot spots highlighted the ecological importance of most of the western Mediterranean shelves (and in particular, the Strait of Gibraltar and the adjacent Alboran Sea), western African coast, the Adriatic, and the Aegean Sea, which show high concentrations of endangered, threatened, or vulnerable species. The Levantine Basin, severely impacted by the invasion of species, is endangered as well. This abstract has been translated to other languages (File S1).
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Local ecological knowledge versus published literature: a review of non-indigenous Mollusca in Greek marine waters

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Fish assemblages of Cais do Carvão Bay (Madeira Island) determined by the visual census technique

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Biodivers Data J
                Biodivers Data J
                1
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:F9B2E808-C883-5F47-B276-6D62129E4FF4
                urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:245B00E9-BFE5-4B4F-B76E-15C30BA74C02
                Biodiversity Data Journal
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2836
                1314-2828
                2020
                23 November 2020
                : 8
                Affiliations
                [1 ] iSea, Environmental Organization for the Preservation of Aquatic Ecosystems, Thessaloniki, Greece iSea, Environmental Organization for the Preservation of Aquatic Ecosystems Thessaloniki Greece
                [2 ] Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Napoli, Italy Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn Napoli Italy
                [3 ] Marine and Environmental Research (MER) Lab Ltd, Zygi, Cyprus Marine and Environmental Research (MER) Lab Ltd Zygi Cyprus
                [4 ] Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Department of Biology, University of Pisa Pisa Italy
                [5 ] Ente Fauna Marina Mediterranea, Avola, Italy Ente Fauna Marina Mediterranea Avola Italy
                [6 ] Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, University of Catania Catania Italy
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Valentina Tanduo ( valentina.tanduo@ 123456szn.it ).

                Academic editor: Felipe Ottoni

                Article
                58646 14815
                10.3897/BDJ.8.e58646
                7704525
                Nikos Doumpas, Valentina Tanduo, Fabio Crocetta, Ioannis Giovos, Joachim Langeneck, Francesco Tiralongo, Periklis Kleitou

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, Tables: 0, References: 44
                Categories
                Short Communication

                Comments

                Comment on this article