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      Spontaneous Normalization of Negative T Waves in Infarct-Related Leads Reflects Improvement in Left Ventricular Wall Motion even in Patients with Persistent Abnormal Q Waves after Anterior Wall Acute Myocardial Infarction

      , , ,

      Cardiology

      S. Karger AG

      Acute myocardial infarction, T wave, Q wave

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          Abstract

          This study aimed to clarify whether spontaneous T-wave normalization (TWN) in infarct-related leads reflects improvement in left ventricular (LV) wall motion even in patients with persistent abnormal Q waves after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Eighty-five patients were classified into the following 3 groups: patients with Q-wave regression (group A, n = 21), those with persistent abnormal Q waves and TWN (group B, n = 36), and those with persistent abnormal Q waves and absence of TWN (group C, n = 28). Groups A and B had greater improvement in LV ejection fraction and regional wall motion between 1 and 6 months after AMI than group C. In conclusion, spontaneous TWN in the healing stage of anterior AMI reflects functional recovery of viable myocardium in the infarct region even in patients with persistent abnormal Q waves.

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          Most cited references 1

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          Significance of Q-wave regression after anterior wall acute myocardial infarction.

           M Nasu,  A Tamura,  K Nagase (1998)
          This study was conducted to clarify the significance of abnormal Q-wave regression in anterior wall acute myocardial infarction. A total of 74 patients who presented with a first anterior wall acute myocardial infarction within 6 h of onset were divided into two groups according to the presence (group A, n = 29) or absence (group B, n = 45) of regression of abnormal Q waves. Regression of abnormal Q waves was defined as the disappearance of the Q wave and the reappearance of the r wave > or = 0.1 mV in at least one of leads I, aVL, and V1 to V6. Emergency coronary arteriography revealed that group A had a higher incidence of spontaneous recanalization or good collateral circulation than group B (55% vs 31%, P < 0.05). Peak creatine kinase activity tended to be lower in group A than in group B (2358 +/- 1796 vs 3092 +/- 1946 IU.L-1, P = 0.09). Group A had a greater left ventricular ejection fraction and better regional wall motion at 1 and 6 months after acute myocardial infarction than group B. The degree of improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction and regional wall motion between 1 and 6 months after acute myocardial infarction was significantly greater in group A than in group B. Patients with anterior wall acute myocardial infarction showing Q-wave regression had a trend towards a smaller amount of necrotic myocardium and a significantly larger amount of stunned myocardium.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            CRD
            Cardiology
            10.1159/issn.0008-6312
            Cardiology
            S. Karger AG
            0008-6312
            1421-9751
            2001
            December 2001
            10 December 2001
            : 96
            : 2
            : 94-99
            Affiliations
            Second Department of Internal Medicine, Oita Medical University, Oita, Japan
            Article
            49090 Cardiology 2001;96:94–99
            10.1159/000049090
            11740138
            © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

            Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

            Page count
            Figures: 3, Tables: 2, References: 27, Pages: 6
            Categories
            Coronary Care

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