12
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Interaction between circadian rhythms and stress

      1 , 1 , , ,

      Neurobiology of Stress

      Elsevier

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Life on earth has adapted to the day-night cycle by evolution of internal, so-called circadian clocks that adjust behavior and physiology to the recurring changes in environmental conditions. In mammals, a master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus receives environmental light information and synchronizes peripheral tissues and central non-SCN clocks to geophysical time. Regulatory systems such as the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the autonomic nervous system (ANS), both being important for the regulation of stress responses, receive strong circadian input. In this review, we summarize the interaction of circadian and stress systems and the resulting physiological and pathophysiological consequences. Finally, we critically discuss the relevance of rodent stress studies for humans, addressing complications of translational approaches and offering strategies to optimize animal studies from a chronobiological perspective.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 137

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Disruption of the Clock Components CLOCK and BMAL1 Leads to Hypoinsulinemia and Diabetes

          The molecular clock maintains energy constancy by producing circadian oscillations of rate-limiting enzymes involved in tissue metabolism across the day and night1–3. During periods of feeding, pancreatic islets secrete insulin to maintain glucose homeostasis, and while rhythmic control of insulin release is recognized to be dysregulated in humans with diabetes4, it is not known how the circadian clock may affect this process. Here we show that pancreatic islets possess self-sustained circadian gene and protein oscillations of the transcription factors CLOCK and BMAL1. The phase of oscillation of islet genes involved in growth, glucose metabolism, and insulin signaling is delayed in circadian mutant mice, and both Clock 5,6 and Bmal1 7 mutants exhibit impaired glucose tolerance, reduced insulin secretion, and defects in size and proliferation of pancreatic islets that worsen with age. Clock disruption leads to transcriptome-wide alterations in the expression of islet genes involved in growth, survival, and synaptic vesicle assembly. Remarkably, conditional ablation of the pancreatic clock causes diabetes mellitus due to defective β-cell function at the very latest stage of stimulus-secretion coupling. These results demonstrate a role for the β-cell clock in coordinating insulin secretion with the sleep-wake cycle, and reveal that ablation of the pancreatic clock can trigger onset of diabetes mellitus.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Early aging and age-related pathologies in mice deficient in BMAL1, the core componentof the circadian clock.

            Mice deficient in the circadian transcription factor BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like protein) have impaired circadian behavior and demonstrate loss of rhythmicity in the expression of target genes. Here we report that Bmal1(-/-) mice have reduced lifespans and display various symptoms of premature aging including sarcopenia, cataracts, less subcutaneous fat, organ shrinkage, and others. The early aging phenotype correlates with increased levels of reactive oxygen species in some tissues of the Bmal1(-/- )animals. These findings, together with data on CLOCK/BMAL1-dependent control of stress responses, may provide a mechanistic explanation for the early onset of age-related pathologies in the absence of BMAL1.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Loss of a circadian adrenal corticosterone rhythm following suprachiasmatic lesions in the rat.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Neurobiol Stress
                Neurobiol Stress
                Neurobiology of Stress
                Elsevier
                2352-2895
                08 September 2016
                February 2017
                08 September 2016
                : 6
                : 57-67
                Affiliations
                University of Lübeck, Chronophysiology Group, Medical Department 1, Lübeck, Germany
                Author notes
                []Corresponding author. Chronophysiology Group, Medical Department 1, University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538 Lübeck, Germany.Chronophysiology GroupMedical Department 1University of LübeckRatzeburger Allee 160LübeckD-23538Germany henrik.oster@ 123456uksh.de
                [1]

                Contributed equally.

                Article
                S2352-2895(16)30019-4
                10.1016/j.ynstr.2016.09.001
                5314421
                © 2016 The Authors

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article