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      NIH Image to ImageJ: 25 years of image analysis

      , ,  

      Nature Methods

      Springer Nature

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="P1">For the past twenty five years the NIH family of imaging software, NIH Image and ImageJ have been pioneers as open tools for scientific image analysis. We discuss the origins, challenges and solutions of these two programs, and how their history can serve to advise and inform other software projects. </p>

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          Most cited references 6

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          ImageJ for microscopy.

           Tony Collins (2007)
          ImageJ is an essential tool for us that fulfills most of our routine image processing and analysis requirements. The near-comprehensive range of import filters that allow easy access to image and meta-data, a broad suite processing and analysis routine, and enthusiastic support from a friendly mailing list are invaluable for all microscopy labs and facilities-not just those on a budget.
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            Metadata matters: access to image data in the real world

            Data sharing is important in the biological sciences to prevent duplication of effort, to promote scientific integrity, and to facilitate and disseminate scientific discovery. Sharing requires centralized repositories, and submission to and utility of these resources require common data formats. This is particularly challenging for multidimensional microscopy image data, which are acquired from a variety of platforms with a myriad of proprietary file formats (PFFs). In this paper, we describe an open standard format that we have developed for microscopy image data. We call on the community to use open image data standards and to insist that all imaging platforms support these file formats. This will build the foundation for an open image data repository.
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              CellProfiler™: free, versatile software for automated biological image analysis

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Methods
                Nat Methods
                Springer Nature
                1548-7091
                1548-7105
                July 2012
                July 1 2012
                July 2012
                : 9
                : 7
                : 671-675
                Article
                10.1038/nmeth.2089
                5554542
                22930834
                © 2012

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