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      Chemical composition, antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of Tagetes minuta and Ocimum basilicum essential oils

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          Abstract

          Chemical composition, antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of Tagetes minuta (TM) essential oil (TMO) and Ocimum basilicum (OB) essential oil (OBO) were examined. The main components for TMO were dihydrotagetone (33.9%), E-ocimene (19.9%), tagetone (16.1%), cis- β-ocimene (7.9%), Z-ocimene (5.3%), limonene (3.1%) and epoxyocimene (2.03%). The main components for OBO were methylchavicol (46.9%), geranial (19.1%), neral (15.15%), geraniol (3.0%), nerol (3.0%), caryophyllene (2.4%). Inhibitory concentrations (IC 50) for reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) scavenging were 12–17 and 200–250  μg/mL of TMO and OBO, respectively. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus niger, and Candida albicans were 150 ± 8, 165 ± 9, 67 ± 8, 75 ± 7, 135 ± 15, and 115 ± 8  μg/mL of TMO, respectively. MIC for S. typhi, E. coli, S. aureus, B. subtilis, A. niger, and C. albicans were 145 ± 8, 160 ± 7, 45 ± 4, 40 ± 3, 80 ± 9, and 95 ± 7  μg/mL of OBO, respectively. IC 50 for nasopharyngeal cancer cell line (KB) and liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) were 75 ± 5 and 70 ± 4  μg/mL of TMO, respectively. IC 50 for KB and HepG2 were 45 ± 4 and 40 ± 3  μg/mL of OBO, respectively. Thus, they could be used as an effective source of natural antioxidant and antibacterial additive to protect foods from oxidative damages and foodborne pathogens. Furthermore, they could be promising candidate for antitumor drug design.

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          Most cited references 58

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          Identification of Essential Oil Components by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

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            Repellent activity of essential oils: a review.

            Currently, the use of synthetic chemicals to control insects and arthropods raises several concerns related to environment and human health. An alternative is to use natural products that possess good efficacy and are environmentally friendly. Among those chemicals, essential oils from plants belonging to several species have been extensively tested to assess their repellent properties as a valuable natural resource. The essential oils whose repellent activities have been demonstrated, as well as the importance of the synergistic effects among their components are the main focus of this review. Essential oils are volatile mixtures of hydrocarbons with a diversity of functional groups, and their repellent activity has been linked to the presence of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. However, in some cases, these chemicals can work synergistically, improving their effectiveness. In addition, the use of other natural products in the mixture, such as vanillin, could increase the protection time, potentiating the repellent effect of some essential oils. Among the plant families with promising essential oils used as repellents, Cymbopogon spp., Ocimum spp. and Eucalyptus spp. are the most cited. Individual compounds present in these mixtures with high repellent activity include alpha-pinene, limonene, citronellol, citronellal, camphor and thymol. Finally, although from an economical point of view synthetic chemicals are still more frequently used as repellents than essential oils, these natural products have the potential to provide efficient, and safer repellents for humans and the environment.
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              Screening of 70 medicinal plant extracts for antioxidant capacity and total phenols

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Food Sci Nutr
                Food Sci Nutr
                fsn3
                Food Science & Nutrition
                Wiley Periodicals Inc
                2048-7177
                2048-7177
                March 2014
                16 January 2014
                : 2
                : 2
                : 146-155
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute of Biotechnology, Shiraz University Shiraz, 71441-65186, Iran
                [2 ]Department of Natural Resources, Fars Research center for Agriculture and Natural Resources Shiraz, 19395-3697, Iran
                Author notes
                Correspondence Gholamreza Kavoosi, Institute of Biotechnology, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71441-65186, Iran. Tel/Fax: +987112272805;, E-mail: ghkavoosi@ 123456shirazu.ac.ir
                Article
                10.1002/fsn3.85
                3959961
                24804073
                © 2014 The Authors. Food Science & Nutrition published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

                This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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                Original Research

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