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      The struggle to provide: how poverty is experienced in the context of family care

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      Journal of Poverty and Social Justice
      Bristol University Press

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          Abstract

          In this paper, I argue that we look through the lens of family care to show how economic scarcity translates into an actual experience of everyday life. Referring to analyses from narrative interviews with people in deprived life circumstances who live across the UK and the Republic of Ireland, I introduce care work as one situational context in which precarious living conditions become tangible for my interviewees. In addition, I demonstrate that gendered expectations concerning mother- and fatherhood make a difference for how women and men experience poverty. Yet, as stereotypical as this may seem, there is more to tell.

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          Research on Household Labor: Modeling and Measuring the Social Embeddedness of Routine Family Work

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            Rights-based approaches to addressing food poverty and food insecurity in Ireland and UK.

            Food poverty is an important contributing factor to health inequalities in industrialised countries; it refers to the inability to acquire or eat an adequate quality or sufficient quantity of food in socially acceptable ways (or the uncertainty of being able to do so). Synonymous with household food insecurity, the issue needs to be located within a social justice framework. Recognising the clear interdependence between the right to food and the right to health, this paper explores how international human rights obligations could inform approaches to addressing food poverty and insecurity with specific reference to Ireland and the UK. Little attention has been paid to how countries should meet their obligations to respect, protect and fulfil the right to food in developed countries. The paper contributes by examining the social and policy circumstances which inhibit poor households from obtaining sufficient food to eat healthily, along with strategies and interventions from State and civil society actors in the two countries. In practice, problems and potential solutions have largely been directed towards the individual rather than at social determinants, particularly as research on environmental factors such as distance to shops has produced equivocal results. Other key structural aspects such as income sufficiency for food are broadly ignored by the State, and anti-poverty strategies are often implemented without monitoring for effects on food outcomes. Thus scant evidence exists for either Ireland or the UK meeting its rights to food obligations to date, in terms of roles and responsibilities in ensuring access to affordable, available and appropriate food for all. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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              Growing Up in Poor Neighbourhoods

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Poverty and Social Justice
                Bristol University Press
                1759-8273
                1759-8281
                February 2020
                February 2020
                : 28
                : 1
                : 119-134
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of Leipzig, Germany
                Article
                10.1332/175982719X15728631102843
                e11ef816-1da1-4826-9fd3-c77115b0b1b3
                © 2020
                History

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