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      Interglacial intensity in the North Atlantic over the last 800 000 years: investigating the complexity of the mid-Brunhes Event : INTERGLACIAL INTENSITY IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC

      1 , 2
      Journal of Quaternary Science
      Wiley

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          Links between iron supply, marine productivity, sea surface temperature, and CO2over the last 1.1 Ma

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            A mid-brunhes climatic event: long-term changes in global atmosphere and ocean circulation.

            A long-term climatic change 4.0 x 10(5) to 3.0 x 10(5) years ago is recorded in deep-sea sediments of the Angola and Canary basins in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. In the Angola Basin (Southern Hemisphere) the climatic signal shows a transition to more humid ("interglacial") conditions in equatorial Africa, and in the Canary Basin (Northern Hemisphere) to more "glacial" oceanic conditions. This trend is confirmed by comparison with all well-documented marine and continental records from various latitudes available; in the Northern Hemisphere, in the Atlantic north of 20 degrees N, climate merged into more "glacial" conditions and in equatorial regions and in the Southern Hemisphere to more "interglacial" conditions. The data point to a more northern position of early Brunhes oceanic fronts and to an intensified atmosphere and ocean surface circulation in the Southern Hemisphere during that time, probably accompanied by a more zonal circulation in the Northern Hemisphere. The mid-Brunhes climatic change may have been forced by the orbital eccentricity cycle of 4.13 x 10(5) years.
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              High-amplitude variations in North Atlantic sea surface temperature during the early Pliocene warm period

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Quaternary Science
                J. Quaternary Sci.
                Wiley
                02678179
                May 2013
                May 2013
                May 21 2013
                : 28
                : 4
                : 343-348
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Geography; Royal Holloway, University of London; Egham; Surrey; TW20 0EX; UK
                [2 ]Department of Geography; Durham University, Science Laboratories; South Road; Durham; DH1 3LE; UK
                Article
                10.1002/jqs.2632
                e161dbe6-174a-4675-a816-c0cb160ea17e
                © 2013

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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