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An intensive mental coaching period also incites interactive changes in metabolic parameters and electrolytes – a peculiar role for Mg

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      Abstract

      Abstract. Eight managers were subjected to a 3-day intensive coaching including guided relaxation. Metabolic markers (pH, pCO 2 , BE, HCO 3 , pO 2 ) and electrolyte levels (ion.Mg) improved along with mental amelioration even to the extent that mental scores and Mg concentrations correlated linearly after coaching, as did heart rate and ion.Mg levels. Successful mental intervention correlates with improvement of metabolic and cardiovascular parameters and even with electrolyte levels, whereby Mg correlations prove themselves as salient markers of Mg state.


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      Most cited references 12

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      Magnesium in man: implications for health and disease.

      Magnesium (Mg(2+)) is an essential ion to the human body, playing an instrumental role in supporting and sustaining health and life. As the second most abundant intracellular cation after potassium, it is involved in over 600 enzymatic reactions including energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Although Mg(2+) availability has been proven to be disturbed during several clinical situations, serum Mg(2+) values are not generally determined in patients. This review aims to provide an overview of the function of Mg(2+) in human health and disease. In short, Mg(2+) plays an important physiological role particularly in the brain, heart, and skeletal muscles. Moreover, Mg(2+) supplementation has been shown to be beneficial in treatment of, among others, preeclampsia, migraine, depression, coronary artery disease, and asthma. Over the last decade, several hereditary forms of hypomagnesemia have been deciphered, including mutations in transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 (TRPM6), claudin 16, and cyclin M2 (CNNM2). Recently, mutations in Mg(2+) transporter 1 (MagT1) were linked to T-cell deficiency underlining the important role of Mg(2+) in cell viability. Moreover, hypomagnesemia can be the consequence of the use of certain types of drugs, such as diuretics, epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, calcineurin inhibitors, and proton pump inhibitors. This review provides an extensive and comprehensive overview of Mg(2+) research over the last few decades, focusing on the regulation of Mg(2+) homeostasis in the intestine, kidney, and bone and disturbances which may result in hypomagnesemia.
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        Update on the relationship between magnesium and exercise.

        Magnesium is involved in numerous processes that affect muscle function including oxygen uptake, energy production and electrolyte balance. Thus, the relationship between magnesium status and exercise has received significant research attention. This research has shown that exercise induces a redistribution of magnesium in the body to accommodate metabolic needs. There is evidence that marginal magnesium deficiency impairs exercise performance and amplifies the negative consequences of strenuous exercise (e.g., oxidative stress). Strenuous exercise apparently increases urinary and sweat losses that may increase magnesium requirements by 10-20%. Based on dietary surveys and recent human experiments, a magnesium intake less than 260 mg/day for male and 220 mg/day for female athletes may result in a magnesium-deficient status. Recent surveys also indicate that a significant number of individuals routinely have magnesium intakes that may result in a deficient status. Athletes participating in sports requiring weight control (e.g., wrestling, gymnastics) are apparently especially vulnerable to an inadequate magnesium status. Magnesium supplementation or increased dietary intake of magnesium will have beneficial effects on exercise performance in magnesium-deficient individuals. Magnesium supplementation of physically active individuals with adequate magnesium status has not been shown to enhance physical performance. An activity-linked RNI or RDA based on long-term balance data from well-controlled human experiments should be determined so that physically active individuals can ascertain whether they have a magnesium intake that may affect their performance or enhance their risk to adverse health consequences (e.g., immunosuppression, oxidative damage, arrhythmias).
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          A system of changes of ionized blood Mg through sports and supplementation

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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Trace Elements and Electrolytes
            TE
            Dustri-Verlag Dr. Karl Feistle
            0946-2104
            July 05 2018
            10.5414/TEX01540
            © 2018

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