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      RNA-seq differential expression studies: more sequence or more replication?

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      Bioinformatics
      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Abstract

          RNA-seq is replacing microarrays as the primary tool for gene expression studies. Many RNA-seq studies have used insufficient biological replicates, resulting in low statistical power and inefficient use of sequencing resources. We show the explicit trade-off between more biological replicates and deeper sequencing in increasing power to detect differentially expressed (DE) genes. In the human cell line MCF7, adding more sequencing depth after 10 M reads gives diminishing returns on power to detect DE genes, whereas adding biological replicates improves power significantly regardless of sequencing depth. We also propose a cost-effectiveness metric for guiding the design of large-scale RNA-seq DE studies. Our analysis showed that sequencing less reads and performing more biological replication is an effective strategy to increase power and accuracy in large-scale differential expression RNA-seq studies, and provided new insights into efficient experiment design of RNA-seq studies. The code used in this paper is provided on: http://home.uchicago.edu/∼jiezhou/replication/. The expression data is deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus under the accession ID GSE51403.

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          Most cited references15

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          edgeR: a Bioconductor package for differential expression analysis of digital gene expression data

          Summary: It is expected that emerging digital gene expression (DGE) technologies will overtake microarray technologies in the near future for many functional genomics applications. One of the fundamental data analysis tasks, especially for gene expression studies, involves determining whether there is evidence that counts for a transcript or exon are significantly different across experimental conditions. edgeR is a Bioconductor software package for examining differential expression of replicated count data. An overdispersed Poisson model is used to account for both biological and technical variability. Empirical Bayes methods are used to moderate the degree of overdispersion across transcripts, improving the reliability of inference. The methodology can be used even with the most minimal levels of replication, provided at least one phenotype or experimental condition is replicated. The software may have other applications beyond sequencing data, such as proteome peptide count data. Availability: The package is freely available under the LGPL licence from the Bioconductor web site (http://bioconductor.org). Contact: mrobinson@wehi.edu.au
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            BEDTools: a flexible suite of utilities for comparing genomic features

            Motivation: Testing for correlations between different sets of genomic features is a fundamental task in genomics research. However, searching for overlaps between features with existing web-based methods is complicated by the massive datasets that are routinely produced with current sequencing technologies. Fast and flexible tools are therefore required to ask complex questions of these data in an efficient manner. Results: This article introduces a new software suite for the comparison, manipulation and annotation of genomic features in Browser Extensible Data (BED) and General Feature Format (GFF) format. BEDTools also supports the comparison of sequence alignments in BAM format to both BED and GFF features. The tools are extremely efficient and allow the user to compare large datasets (e.g. next-generation sequencing data) with both public and custom genome annotation tracks. BEDTools can be combined with one another as well as with standard UNIX commands, thus facilitating routine genomics tasks as well as pipelines that can quickly answer intricate questions of large genomic datasets. Availability and implementation: BEDTools was written in C++. Source code and a comprehensive user manual are freely available at http://code.google.com/p/bedtools Contact: aaronquinlan@gmail.com; imh4y@virginia.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
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              Differential expression analysis for sequence count data

              High-throughput sequencing assays such as RNA-Seq, ChIP-Seq or barcode counting provide quantitative readouts in the form of count data. To infer differential signal in such data correctly and with good statistical power, estimation of data variability throughout the dynamic range and a suitable error model are required. We propose a method based on the negative binomial distribution, with variance and mean linked by local regression and present an implementation, DESeq, as an R/Bioconductor package.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Bioinformatics
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                1460-2059
                1367-4803
                February 1 2014
                February 01 2014
                December 4 2013
                February 1 2014
                February 01 2014
                December 4 2013
                : 30
                : 3
                : 301-304
                Article
                10.1093/bioinformatics/btt688
                3904521
                24319002
                e170463e-a635-4a2b-bb50-eaff100c16f9
                © 2013
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