14
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Bacterial biofilm development as a multicellular adaptation: antibiotic resistance and new therapeutic strategies.

      Current Opinion in Microbiology

      Anti-Bacterial Agents, isolation & purification, pharmacology, Bacteria, growth & development, Bacterial Physiological Phenomena, Biofilms, drug effects, Drug Resistance, Bacterial

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Bacteria have evolved the ability to form multicellular, surface-adherent communities called biofilms that allow survival in hostile environments. In clinical settings, bacteria are exposed to various sources of stress, including antibiotics, nutrient limitation, anaerobiosis, heat shock, etc., which in turn trigger adaptive responses in bacterial cells. The combination of this and other defense mechanisms results in the formation of highly (adaptively) resistant multicellular structures that are recalcitrant to host immune clearance mechanisms and very difficult to eradicate with the currently available antimicrobial agents, which are generally developed for the eradication of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria. However, novel strategies that specifically target the biofilm mode of growth have been recently described, thus providing the basis for future anti-biofilm therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          23880136
          10.1016/j.mib.2013.06.013

          Comments

          Comment on this article