Blog
About

9
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Characteristics of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in the pulmonology clinics of seven Asian cities

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background and objectives

          Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. We evaluated the characteristics of stable COPD patients in the pulmonology clinics of seven Asian cities and also evaluated whether the exposure to biomass fuels and dusty jobs were related to respiratory symptoms, airflow limitation, and quality of life in the COPD patients.

          Methods

          This cross-sectional observational study recruited 922 COPD patients from seven cities of Asia. The patients underwent spirometry and were administered questionnaires about their exposure to cigarette smoking, biomass fuels, and dusty jobs in addition to respiratory symptoms and health related quality of life.

          Results

          Of the patients, there appeared to be variations from city to city in the history of exposure to biomass fuels and dusty jobs and also in respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm, wheeze, and dyspnea. These symptoms were more frequent in those COPD patients with a history of exposure to biomass fuels than without and those with a history of exposure to dusty jobs than without ( P < 0.01 for all comparisons). Airflow limitation was more severe in those COPD patients with a history of exposure to biomass fuels than without (52.2% predicted versus 55.9% of post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV 1], P = 0.009); quality of life was poorer in those with exposure to biomass fuels than without (40.4 versus 36.2 of the St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ] total score, P = 0.001). Airflow limitation was more severe in those COPD patients with a history of exposure to dusty jobs than without (51.2% predicted versus 57.3% of post-bronchodilator FEV 1, P < 0.001); quality of life was poorer in those with dusty jobs than without (41.0 versus 34.6 of SGRQ score, P = 0.006).

          Conclusion

          In Asian cities, the characteristics of COPD patients vary and the history of exposure to biomass fuels or dusty jobs was related to frequency of symptoms, severe airflow limitation, and poor quality of life.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 18

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Epidemiology Standardization Project (American Thoracic Society).

           B Ferris (1978)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The significance of respiratory symptoms and the diagnosis of chronic bronchitis in a working population.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              COPD: epidemiology, prevalence, morbidity and mortality, and disease heterogeneity.

               D. Mannino (2002)
              COPD continues to cause a heavy health and economic burden both in the United States and around the world. Some of the risk factors for COPD are well-known and include smoking, occupational exposures, air pollution, airway hyperresponsiveness, asthma, and certain genetic variations, although many questions, such as why < 20% of smokers develop significant airway obstruction, remain. Precise definitions of COPD vary and are frequently dependent on an accurate diagnosis of the problem by a physician. These differences in the definition of COPD can have large effects on the estimates of COPD in the population. Furthermore, evidence that COPD represents several different disease processes with potentially different interventions continues to emerge. In most of the world, COPD prevalence and mortality are still increasing and likely will continue to rise in response to increases in smoking, particularly by women and adolescents. Resources aimed at smoking cessation and prevention, COPD education and early detection, and better treatment will be of the most benefit in our continuing efforts against this important cause of morbidity and mortality.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2013
                2013
                14 January 2013
                : 8
                : 31-39
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea;
                [2 ]Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care, “Friends of the Breathless” Foundation, Pune, India;
                [3 ]Department of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand;
                [4 ]Central Chest Clinic, Colombo and National Hospital of Sri Lanka;
                [5 ]Respiratory Disease Treatment Unit and Teaching Hospital Kandy, Sri Lanka;
                [6 ]Section of Respiratory Services and Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Lung Center of the Philippines, Quezon City, Philippines;
                [7 ]Department of Internal Medicine, Kangwon National University, Kang Won, Korea;
                [8 ]Department of Thoracic Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan;
                [9 ]Respiratory Care Center, University Medical Center Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam;
                [10 ]Department of Medicine, Penang Medical College, Penang, Malaysia;
                [11 ]Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore;
                [12 ]Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Japan;
                [13 ]Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA;
                [14 ]Beijing Institute of Respiratory Medicine, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Sang-Do Lee Coordination Center, The Asian Network for Obstructive Lung Disease (ANOLD), Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro, 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, Korea Tel +82 2 3010 3140 Fax +82 2 3010 6968 Email sdlee@ 123456amc.seoul.kr
                Article
                copd-8-031
                3553655
                23378753
                © 2013 Oh et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd

                This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Respiratory medicine

                dust, copd, biomass, asia

                Comments

                Comment on this article