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      To other new educational ways for interdisciplinary cooperation and innovation: about a student-driven hackathon

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          Abstract

          Background: Innovation in healthcare cannot be conceived without an interdisciplinary approach. Hackathons are an innovative approach to promote team working and demonstrated an interest in higher education through inquiry-based learning. An interdisciplinary team of students and young professionals organized the first hybrid presential and online neurorehabilitation hackathon, within the joined 2020 WCNR-SOFMER congress, adapting to the COVID-19 pandemic.

          Methods: Interdisciplinary teams worked during two days on concrete issues met by people with a disability and their caregivers, accompanied by multi-skilled mentors to create tangible solutions. An independent jury selected the winning project.

          Results: HRL met the expectations of 96% of the 31 participants. They reported better knowledge and ability about teamwork, ethics, and patient-centered approaches.

          Conclusions: HRL allowed the creation of a strong interdisciplinary and international network which will be valuable to foster innovation. It demonstrated its value in the junior and students’ training for teamwork, communication, creativity in innovation, and ethics in health.

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          Most cited references9

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          Less noise, more hacking: how to deploy principles from MIT's hacking medicine to accelerate health care.

          Medical technology offers enormous potential for scalable medicine--to improve the quality and access in health care while simultaneously reducing cost. However, current medical device innovation within companies often only offers incremental advances on existing products, or originates from engineers with limited knowledge of the clinical complexities. We describe how the Hacking Medicine Initiative, based at Massachusetts Institute of Technology has developed an innovative "healthcare hackathon" approach, bringing diverse teams together to rapidly validate clinical needs and develop solutions. Hackathons are based on three core principles; emphasis on a problem-based approach, cross-pollination of disciplines, and "pivoting" on or rapidly iterating on ideas. Hackathons also offer enormous potential for innovation in global health by focusing on local needs and resources as well as addressing feasibility and cultural contextualization. Although relatively new, the success of this approach is clear, as evidenced by the development of successful startup companies, pioneering product design, and the incorporation of creative people from outside traditional life science backgrounds who are working with clinicians and other scientists to create transformative innovation in health care.
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            Healthcare Hackathons Provide Educational and Innovation Opportunities: A Case Study and Best Practice Recommendations

            Physicians and other healthcare professionals are often the end users of medical innovation; however, they are rarely involved in the beginning design stages. This often results in ineffective healthcare solutions with poor adoption rates. At the early design stage, innovation would benefit from input from healthcare professionals. This report describes the first-ever rehabilitation hackathon—an interdisciplinary and competitive team event aimed at accelerating and improving healthcare solutions and providing an educational experience for participants. Hackathons are gaining traction as a way to accelerate innovation by bringing together a diverse group of interdisciplinary professionals from different industries who work collaboratively in teams and learn from each other, focus on a specific problem (“pain point”), develop a solution using design thinking techniques, pitch the solution to participants, gather fast feedback and quickly alter the prototype design (“pivoting”). 102 hackers including 19 (18.6 %) physicians and other professionals participated, and over the course of 2 days worked in teams, pitched ideas and developed design prototypes. Three awards were given for prototypes that may improve function in persons with disabilities. 43 hackers were women (42.2 %) and 59 men (57.8 %); they ranged in age from 16 to 79 years old; and, of the 75 hackers who reported their age, 63 (84 %) were less than 40 years old and 12 (16 %) were 40 years or older. This report contributes to the emerging literature on healthcare hackathons as a means of providing interdisciplinary education and training and supporting innovation.
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              Health hackathons: theatre or substance? A survey assessment of outcomes from healthcare-focused hackathons in three countries

              Background Healthcare-focused hackathons are 48-hour platforms intended to accelerate novel medical technology. However, debate exists about how much they contribute to medical technology innovation. The Consortium for Affordable Medical Technologies (CAMTech) has developed a three-pronged model to maximise their effectiveness. To gauge the success of this model, we examined follow-up outcomes. Methods Outcomes of 12 hackathons from 2012 to 2015 in India, Uganda and the USA were measured using emailed surveys. To minimise response bias, non-responding teams were coded as having made no progress. Results 331 individuals provided information on 196 of 356 projects (55.1% response rate), with no difference in responses from teams participating in different countries (Cramer's V=0.09, p=0.17). 30.3% of projects had made progress after a mean of 12.2 months. 88 (24.7%) teams had initiated pilot testing, with 42 (11.8%) piloting with care providers and 24 (6.7%) with patients. Overall, 97 teams (8.1 per hackathon) drafted business plans, 22 (1.8 per hackathon) had filed patents on their innovations and 15 (1.3 per hackathon) had formed new companies. Teams raised US$64.08 million in funding (average US$5.34 million per hackathon; median award size of $1800). In addition, 108 teams (30.3%) reported at least one member working on additional technologies with people they met at a hackathon. Individual confidence to address medical technology challenges was significantly increased after attending (t(1282)=192.77, p 0.001). Conclusion CAMTech healthcare hackathons lead to consistent output with respect to medical technology innovation, including clinical trials, business plan development, securing investment capital/funding and new company formation.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                MedEdPublish
                MedEdPublish
                F1000 Research Ltd
                2312-7996
                2022
                March 17 2022
                : 12
                : 20
                Article
                10.12688/mep.18991.1
                e253ca00-5312-43a4-94f8-5a12b232c47e
                © 2022

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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