29
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Global estimates of shark catches using trade records from commercial markets.

      Ecology Letters

      Animals, Commerce, statistics & numerical data, Conservation of Natural Resources, Population Dynamics, Sharks, genetics, physiology

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Despite growing concerns about overexploitation of sharks, lack of accurate, species-specific harvest data often hampers quantitative stock assessment. In such cases, trade studies can provide insights into exploitation unavailable from traditional monitoring. We applied Bayesian statistical methods to trade data in combination with genetic identification to estimate by species, the annual number of globally traded shark fins, the most commercially valuable product from a group of species often unrecorded in harvest statistics. Our results provide the first fishery-independent estimate of the scale of shark catches worldwide and indicate that shark biomass in the fin trade is three to four times higher than shark catch figures reported in the only global data base. Comparison of our estimates to approximated stock assessment reference points for one of the most commonly traded species, blue shark, suggests that current trade volumes in numbers of sharks are close to or possibly exceeding the maximum sustainable yield levels.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 19

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Multiple Imputation after 18+ Years

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Collapse and conservation of shark populations in the Northwest Atlantic.

            Overexploitation threatens the future of many large vertebrates. In the ocean, tunas and sea turtles are current conservation concerns because of this intense pressure. The status of most shark species, in contrast, remains uncertain. Using the largest data set in the Northwest Atlantic, we show rapid large declines in large coastal and oceanic shark populations. Scalloped hammerhead, white, and thresher sharks are each estimated to have declined by over 75% in the past 15 years. Closed-area models highlight priority areas for shark conservation, and the need to consider effort reallocation and site selection if marine reserves are to benefit multiple threatened species.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Intrinsic rebound potentials of 26 species of Pacific sharks

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                16972875
                10.1111/j.1461-0248.2006.00968.x

                Comments

                Comment on this article