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      Investigation of Train Driver Physiological Responses

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      Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Human Computer Interaction Conference

      4 - 6 July 2018

      Workload measurement, rail human factors, heart rate, galvanic skin response, psychophysiology, ambulatory monitoring, wearable sensors

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          Abstract

          Train Driver workload is an under-researched area. Operator workload has been extensively studied in the automotive, aeronautical and other domains using performance, subjective and physiological measures. In this exploratory study, we combine subjective self-report measures with a task-based measure of workload and physiological measures. Heart Rate and Galvanic Skin Response are collected from train drivers over the course of their journey. These signals are analysed with respect to subjective and task-based measures of workload, but no reliable correlations were found between the physiological and other workload measures. However, the results show that peaks in both the Heart Rate and GSR data are associated with particular locations or events and changes in GSR data reflect anticipatory events and are inline with subjective driver commentary. This suggests that further research on physiological measures for train drivers is warranted

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          Most cited references 28

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          Detecting Stress During Real-World Driving Tasks Using Physiological Sensors

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            Physiological workload reactions to increasing levels of task difficulty.

            The sensitivity of physiological measures to mental workload was investigated in a flight simulator. Twelve pilots had to fly through a tunnel with varying levels of difficulty. Additionally, they had to perform a memory task with four levels of difficulty. The easiest memory task was combined with the easiest tunnel task and the most difficult memory task with the most difficult tunnel task. Between the tunnel tasks, subjects had to fly a pursuit task in which a target jet had to be followed. Rest periods before and after the experiment were used as a baseline for the physiological measures. Mental workload was measured with heart period, continuous blood pressure, respiration and eye blinks. Several respiratory parameters, heart rate variability, blood pressure variability and the gain between systolic blood pressure and heart period (modulus) were scored. All measures showed differences between rest and flight, and between the pursuit and the tunnel task. Only heart period was sensitive to difficulty levels in the tunnel task. Heart rate variability increased when respiratory activity around 0.10 Hz increased, which occurred often. The modulus was hardly influenced by respiration and therefore appears to be a better measure than heart rate variability. Among the respiratory parameters, the duration of a respiratory cycle was the most sensitive to changes in workload. The time in between two successive eye blinks (blink interval) increased and the blink duration decreased as more visual information had to be processed. Increasing the difficulty of the memory task led to a decrement in blink interval, probably caused by subvocal activity during rehearsal of target letters. The data show that physiological measures are sensitive to mental effort, whereas rating scales are sensitive to both mental effort and task difficulty.
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              Effects of visual and cognitive load in real and simulated motorway driving

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2018
                July 2018
                : 1-9
                Affiliations
                Trinity College Dublin College Green, Dublin 2
                Article
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.5
                © Crowley et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2018. Belfast, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                32
                Belfast, UK
                4 - 6 July 2018
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Human Computer Interaction Conference
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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