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      The joint effects of supervisor knowledge hiding, abusive supervision, and employee political skill on employee knowledge hiding behaviors

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      Journal of Knowledge Management
      Emerald

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          Knowledge hiding, intentionally withholding work-relevant information, is detrimental to organizations, yet practiced by supervisors and employees. Based on social learning and social exchange theories, this study aims to uncover the effects of supervisor knowledge hiding, abusive supervision and employee political skill on employee knowledge hiding behaviors, namely, evasive hiding, playing dumb and rationalized hiding. We compare the two destructive supervisor behaviors in their predictive values toward employee knowledge hiding and examine the role of employee political skill in mitigating their effects.

          Design/methodology/approach

          Based on survey data collected from 598 German-speaking employees, we used path analysis to test the hypotheses.

          Findings

          The two destructive supervisor behaviors and employee political skill predicted employee evasive hiding and playing dumb; supervisor knowledge hiding additionally predicted employee rationalized hiding. The predictive value of supervisor knowledge hiding was 2.5 times larger than that of abusive supervision and political skill. The effects of destructive supervisor behaviors were weaker for more politically skilled employees.

          Originality/value

          We examine two destructive supervisor behaviors conjointly and show the differences between them regarding their predictive value toward employee knowledge hiding. Furthermore, we investigate the role of political skill in knowledge hiding.

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          Most cited references72

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          Sources of method bias in social science research and recommendations on how to control it.

          Despite the concern that has been expressed about potential method biases, and the pervasiveness of research settings with the potential to produce them, there is disagreement about whether they really are a problem for researchers in the behavioral sciences. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to explore the current state of knowledge about method biases. First, we explore the meaning of the terms "method" and "method bias" and then we examine whether method biases influence all measures equally. Next, we review the evidence of the effects that method biases have on individual measures and on the covariation between different constructs. Following this, we evaluate the procedural and statistical remedies that have been used to control method biases and provide recommendations for minimizing method bias.
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            The Norm of Reciprocity: A Preliminary Statement

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              Back-Translation for Cross-Cultural Research

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Knowledge Management
                JKM
                Emerald
                1367-3270
                1367-3270
                June 29 2022
                June 29 2022
                Article
                10.1108/JKM-08-2021-0655
                e2f13f97-3827-49f5-9088-7187c7a6d505
                © 2022

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