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      Effect of vitamin D supplementation on polycystic ovary syndrome: A meta-analysis

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          Abstract

          The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of vitamin D supplementation on patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A literature search was performed to identify all of the relevant studies comparing the effect of vitamin D supplementation with placebo in PCOS patients, in the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases. All statistical analyses were performed on case-control studies using Review Manager 5.3 software, provided by the Cochrane Collaboration. A total of 11 studies involving 483 participants were included in the current meta-analysis. Vitamin D supplementation appeared to lead to an improvement in the levels of total testosterone [weighted mean differences (WMD) = -0.10, 95% CI (-0.18, -0.02)], homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [WMD = -0.44, 95% CI (-0.86, -0.03)], homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function [WMD = -16.65, 95% CI (-19.49, -13.80)], total cholesterol [WMD = -11.90, 95% CI (-15.67, -8.13)] and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [WMD = -4.54; 95% CI (-7.29, -1.80)]. The results failed to show a positive effect of vitamin D supplementation on the body mass index, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, triglyceride levels or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. In conclusion, the data from the available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggested vitamin D supplementation reduced insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism, as well improving the lipid metabolism of patients with PCOS to an extent. Further high-quality RCTs from a variety of regions in the world are required to determine the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in PCOS patients, and to determine a suitable dose and unit of vitamin D.

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          Most cited references 30

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          Quantitative insulin sensitivity check index: a simple, accurate method for assessing insulin sensitivity in humans.

           S Nambi,  K Mather,  A. Katz (2000)
          Insulin resistance plays an important role in the pathophysiology of diabetes and is associated with obesity and other cardiovascular risk factors. The "gold standard" glucose clamp and minimal model analysis are two established methods for determining insulin sensitivity in vivo, but neither is easily implemented in large studies. Thus, it is of interest to develop a simple, accurate method for assessing insulin sensitivity that is useful for clinical investigations. We performed both hyperinsulinemic isoglycemic glucose clamp and insulin-modified frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance tests on 28 nonobese, 13 obese, and 15 type 2 diabetic subjects. We obtained correlations between indexes of insulin sensitivity from glucose clamp studies (SI(Clamp)) and minimal model analysis (SI(MM)) that were comparable to previous reports (r = 0.57). We performed a sensitivity analysis on our data and discovered that physiological steady state values [i.e. fasting insulin (I(0)) and glucose (G(0))] contain critical information about insulin sensitivity. We defined a quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI = 1/[log(I(0)) + log(G(0))]) that has substantially better correlation with SI(Clamp) (r = 0.78) than the correlation we observed between SI(MM) and SI(Clamp). Moreover, we observed a comparable overall correlation between QUICKI and SI(Clamp) in a totally independent group of 21 obese and 14 nonobese subjects from another institution. We conclude that QUICKI is an index of insulin sensitivity obtained from a fasting blood sample that may be useful for clinical research.
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            Vitamin D deficiency

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              Vitamin D in the aetiology and management of polycystic ovary syndrome.

              Vitamin D deficiency is common in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), with the 67-85% of women with PCOS having serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) <20 ng/ml. Vitamin D deficiency may exacerbate symptoms of PCOS, with observational studies showing lower 25OHD levels were associated with insulin resistance, ovulatory and menstrual irregularities, lower pregnancy success, hirsutism, hyperandrogenism, obesity and elevated cardiovascular disease risk factors. There is some, but limited, evidence for beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation on menstrual dysfunction and insulin resistance in women with PCOS. Vitamin D deficiency may play a role in exacerbating PCOS, and there may be a place for vitamin D supplementation in the management of this syndrome, but current evidence is limited and additional randomized controlled trials are required to confirm the potential benefits of vitamin D supplementation in this population. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Exp Ther Med
                Exp Ther Med
                ETM
                Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
                D.A. Spandidos
                1792-0981
                1792-1015
                April 2020
                11 February 2020
                11 February 2020
                : 19
                : 4
                : 2641-2649
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Third Clinical Medical College, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310053, P.R. China
                [2 ]Department of Anorectal Surgery, Hangzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310000, P.R. China
                [3 ]Department of TCM Gynecology, Hangzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310000, P.R. China
                Author notes
                Correspondence to: Dr Qin Zhang, Department of TCM Gynecology, Hangzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 453 Tiyuchang Road, Shangcheng, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310000, P.R. China zhqin@ 123456zjwh.gov.cn
                Article
                ETM-0-0-8525
                10.3892/etm.2020.8525
                7086222
                Copyright: © Miao et al.

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

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                Medicine

                meta-analysis, vitamin d, polycystic ovary syndrome, lipid metabolic, insulin resistance

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