6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Socio-economic vulnerabilities and HIV: Drivers of transactional sex among female bar workers in Yaoundé, Cameroon

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Introduction

          The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between socio-demographic characteristics, risky sexual behaviour, alcohol use and transactional sex among female bar workers in Yaounde, Cameroon.

          Materials and methods

          A cross-sectional survey was conducted among a representative sample of 410 female bar workers, recruited through a modified version of venue-based cluster sampling technique from May to June 2017. Transactional sex was defined as having received money/gifts in exchange for sex with any sexual partner in the past 12 months. Logistic regression models were performed to identify the factors associated with transactional sex. The level of statistical significance was set at p< = 0.05.

          Results

          About 14.9% (n = 61) of respondents reported to have engaged in transactional sex, 83.7% (n = 338) had multiple sexual partners at the time of the study, 14.4% (n = 55) had sex with one or more of their male customers in the past 6 months. Almost 73.4% (n = 301) reported alcohol use. Of these, 37.2% (n = 112) were frequent alcohol consumers. About 17.6% (n = 72) reported to have had unprotected sex under the influence of alcohol in the past 6 months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that those who engaged in transactional sex were more likely to have had sex with a male customer in the past 6 months (aOR = 7.34; 95% CI, 3.63–16.98), had sex under the influence of alcohol in the past 6 months (aOR = 2.42; 95% CI, 1.18–4.96) and frequent alcohol consumers (aOR = 2.06; 95%CI, 1.04–4.10). Respondents who had their last sexual intercourse 4 weeks or more prior to the study (aOR = 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08–0.84) were less likely to have engaged in transactional sex.

          Conclusions

          Our study concludes that female bar workers are exposed to male customers and engage in risky sexual practices including transaction sex. Most of them also consume alcohol which increases their risk of HIV and STI acquisition. They are a high-risk group that need to be targeted with HIV prevention interventions.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 36

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Alcohol use and sexual risks for HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa: systematic review of empirical findings.

          Alcohol consumption is associated with risks for sexually transmitted infections (STI), including HIV/AIDS. In this paper, we systematically review the literature on alcohol use and sexual risk behavior in southern Africa, the region of the world with the greatest HIV/AIDS burden. Studies show a consistent association between alcohol use and sexual risks for HIV infection. Among people who drink, greater quantities of alcohol consumption predict greater sexual risks than does frequency of drinking. In addition, there are clear gender differences in alcohol use and sexual risks; men are more likely to drink and engage in higher risk behavior whereas women's risks are often associated with their male sex partners' drinking. Factors that are most closely related to alcohol and sexual risks include drinking venues and alcohol serving establishments, sexual coercion, and poverty. Research conducted in southern Africa therefore confirms an association between alcohol use and sexual risks for HIV. Sexual risk reduction interventions are needed for men and women who drink and interventions should be targeted to alcohol serving establishments.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Age-disparate and intergenerational sex in southern Africa: the dynamics of hypervulnerability.

            This paper reviews the current state of knowledge on age-disparate sexual relationships in the context of the southern African HIV/AIDS hyperepidemic. Disproportionately high HIV infection rates among young women aged 15-24 years have been attributed to their greater involvement in relationships with older-aged partners. Whereas early studies emphasized economic concerns in the context of poverty as driving girls to accept or seek the attentions of older employed men, close-grained studies reveal a complex interplay of meanings and motives that prompt both men and women across socioeconomic strata to engage in intergenerational sex. Studies have revealed that age-disparate relationships are meaningful and perceived as beneficial at a number of levels, including social, physical, psychological, as well as economic and symbolic. In the context of growing economic inequalities and cultural expectations for men to give and women to receive a compensation for sex, relationships with older men are a common and readily available way through which young women gain materially, affirm self-worth, achieve social goals, increase longer-term life chances, or otherwise add value and enjoyment to life. Awareness of HIV risks in these relationships remains low. HIV prevention policies and programmes need to start from an understanding of how those engaged in risky behaviour perceive their sexual relationships and conceptualize the choices they make and the strategies they use. A more comprehensive policy on women and girls with better integration of communities in assessing and addressing issues, and an expansion of campaigns and programmes on the role of men as protectors and supporters of women are recommended.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Estimates of the number of female sex workers in different regions of the world.

              To collect estimated numbers of female sex workers (FSW) and present proportions of FSW in the female population (FSW prevalence) in different regions of the world. Subnational and national estimated numbers of FSW reported in published and unpublished literature, as well as from field investigators involved in research or interventions targeted at FSW, were collected. The proportion of FSW in the adult female population was calculated. Subnational estimates were extrapolated to national estimates if appropriate. Population surveys were scanned for proportions of adult women having sex in exchange for money or goods. In sub-Saharan Africa, the FSW prevalence in the capitals ranged between 0.7% and 4.3% and in other urban areas between 0.4% and 4.3%. Population surveys from this same region yielded even higher proportions of women involved in transactional sex. The national FSW prevalence in Asia ranged between 0.2% and 2.6%; in the ex-Russian Federation between 0.1% and 1.5%; in East Europe between 0.4% and 1.4%; in West Europe between 0.1% and 1.4%; and in Latin America between 0.2% and 7.4%. Estimates from rural areas were only available from one country. Although it is well known and accepted that FSW are a highly vulnerable group in the scope of the HIV epidemic, most countries in the world do not know the size of this population group. The estimates of the prevalence of FSW presented in this paper show how important this hard-to-reach population group is in all parts of the world.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: Formal analysisRole: InvestigationRole: MethodologyRole: ResourcesRole: SoftwareRole: SupervisionRole: ValidationRole: Writing – original draftRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Data curationRole: InvestigationRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: SupervisionRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: MethodologyRole: ValidationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: MethodologyRole: SupervisionRole: ValidationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                18 June 2018
                2018
                : 13
                : 6
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Community Research and Training Institute, Yaoundé, Cameroon
                [2 ] Ministry of Public Health, Yaoundé, Cameroon
                [3 ] School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana
                [4 ] Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé 1, Yaoundé, Cameroon
                London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UNITED KINGDOM
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-17-35466
                10.1371/journal.pone.0198853
                6005536
                29912969
                © 2018 Akoku et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 0, Tables: 3, Pages: 13
                Product
                Funding
                The authors received no specific funding for this work. We used our personal savings to support this work.
                Categories
                Research Article
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Nutrition
                Diet
                Alcohol Consumption
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Nutrition
                Diet
                Alcohol Consumption
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Physiology
                Reproductive Physiology
                Copulation
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Physiology
                Reproductive Physiology
                Copulation
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Microbiology
                Medical Microbiology
                Microbial Pathogens
                Viral Pathogens
                Immunodeficiency Viruses
                HIV
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
                Pathogens
                Microbial Pathogens
                Viral Pathogens
                Immunodeficiency Viruses
                HIV
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Viruses
                Viral Pathogens
                Immunodeficiency Viruses
                HIV
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Viruses
                Immunodeficiency Viruses
                HIV
                Biology and life sciences
                Organisms
                Viruses
                RNA viruses
                Retroviruses
                Lentivirus
                HIV
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Microbiology
                Medical Microbiology
                Microbial Pathogens
                Viral Pathogens
                Retroviruses
                Lentivirus
                HIV
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
                Pathogens
                Microbial Pathogens
                Viral Pathogens
                Retroviruses
                Lentivirus
                HIV
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Organisms
                Viruses
                Viral Pathogens
                Retroviruses
                Lentivirus
                HIV
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Nutrition
                Diet
                Beverages
                Alcoholic Beverages
                Beer
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Nutrition
                Diet
                Beverages
                Alcoholic Beverages
                Beer
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Behavior
                Human Sexual Behavior
                Medicine and health sciences
                Public and occupational health
                Preventive medicine
                HIV prevention
                Medicine and health sciences
                Epidemiology
                HIV epidemiology
                People and Places
                Geographical Locations
                Africa
                Cameroon
                Custom metadata
                All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article