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      Acute inhibition by ethanol of intestinal absorption of glucose and hepatic glycogen synthesis on glucose refeeding after starvation in the rat.

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          Abstract

          1. Intragastric administration of ethanol (75 mmol/kg body wt.) at 1 h before glucose refeeding of 24 h-starved rats inhibited hepatic glycogen deposition (by 69%) and synthesis (by approx. 70%), but was without significant effect on muscle glycogen deposition and synthesis. 2. Treatment of ethanol-administered rats with methylpyrazole (an inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase) did not significantly diminish the inhibitory effect of ethanol on hepatic glycogen deposition after glucose refeeding, suggesting that the inhibition was not dependent on ethanol metabolism. 3. Ethanol delayed and diminished intestinal glucose absorption, at least in part by delaying gastric emptying. 4. At a lower dose (10 mmol/kg body wt.), ethanol inhibited hepatic glycogen repletion and synthesis without compromising intestinal glucose absorption. Ethanol inhibited glycogen deposition (by 40%) in hepatocytes from starved rats provided with glucose + lactate + pyruvate as substrates, consistent with it having a direct effect to diminish hepatic glycogen synthesis by inhibition of gluconeogenic flux at a site(s) between phosphoenolpyruvate and triose phosphate in the pathway. 5. It is concluded that ethanol acutely impairs hepatic glycogen repletion by inhibition at at least two distinct sites, namely (a) intestinal glucose absorption and (b) hepatic gluconeogenic flux.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Biochem. J.
          The Biochemical journal
          0264-6021
          0264-6021
          Aug 15 1988
          : 254
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Biochemistry, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, London, U.K.
          Article
          1135039
          3178758

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