12
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Molecular Insights into the Role of Reactive Oxygen, Nitrogen and Sulphur Species in Conferring Salinity Stress Tolerance in Plants

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references212

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant machinery in abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants.

          Various abiotic stresses lead to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants which are highly reactive and toxic and cause damage to proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and DNA which ultimately results in oxidative stress. The ROS comprises both free radical (O(2)(-), superoxide radicals; OH, hydroxyl radical; HO(2), perhydroxy radical and RO, alkoxy radicals) and non-radical (molecular) forms (H(2)O(2), hydrogen peroxide and (1)O(2), singlet oxygen). In chloroplasts, photosystem I and II (PSI and PSII) are the major sites for the production of (1)O(2) and O(2)(-). In mitochondria, complex I, ubiquinone and complex III of electron transport chain (ETC) are the major sites for the generation of O(2)(-). The antioxidant defense machinery protects plants against oxidative stress damages. Plants possess very efficient enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; ascorbate peroxidase, APX; glutathione reductase, GR; monodehydroascorbate reductase, MDHAR; dehydroascorbate reductase, DHAR; glutathione peroxidase, GPX; guaicol peroxidase, GOPX and glutathione-S- transferase, GST) and non-enzymatic (ascorbic acid, ASH; glutathione, GSH; phenolic compounds, alkaloids, non-protein amino acids and α-tocopherols) antioxidant defense systems which work in concert to control the cascades of uncontrolled oxidation and protect plant cells from oxidative damage by scavenging of ROS. ROS also influence the expression of a number of genes and therefore control the many processes like growth, cell cycle, programmed cell death (PCD), abiotic stress responses, pathogen defense, systemic signaling and development. In this review, we describe the biochemistry of ROS and their production sites, and ROS scavenging antioxidant defense machinery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Reactive oxygen species homeostasis and signalling during drought and salinity stresses.

            Water deficit and salinity, especially under high light intensity or in combination with other stresses, disrupt photosynthesis and increase photorespiration, altering the normal homeostasis of cells and cause an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS play a dual role in the response of plants to abiotic stresses functioning as toxic by-products of stress metabolism, as well as important signal transduction molecules. In this review, we provide an overview of ROS homeostasis and signalling in response to drought and salt stresses and discuss the current understanding of ROS involvement in stress sensing, stress signalling and regulation of acclimation responses.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Lipid Peroxidation in Apoptosis, Autophagy, and Ferroptosis

              Reactive oxygen species- (ROS-) induced lipid peroxidation plays a critical role in cell death including apoptosis, autophagy, and ferroptosis. This fundamental and conserved mechanism is based on an excess of ROS which attacks biomembranes, propagates lipid peroxidation chain reactions, and subsequently induces different types of cell death. A highly evolved sophisticated antioxidant system exists that acts to protect the cells from oxidative damage. In this review, we discussed how ROS propagate lipid peroxidation chain reactions and how the products of lipid peroxidation initiate apoptosis and autophagy in current models. We also discussed the mechanism of lipid peroxidation during ferroptosis, and we summarized lipid peroxidation in pathological conditions of critical illness. We aim to bring a more global and integrative sight to know how different ROS-induced lipid peroxidation occurs among apoptosis, autophagy, and ferroptosis.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Journal of Plant Growth Regulation
                J Plant Growth Regul
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0721-7595
                1435-8107
                February 10 2022
                Article
                10.1007/s00344-022-10591-8
                e33c7eae-8783-4efd-b46c-5648ec499cab
                © 2022

                https://www.springer.com/tdm

                https://www.springer.com/tdm

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article