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      Optical Bound States in the Continuum with Nanowire Geometric Superlattices.

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          Abstract

          Perfect trapping of light in a subwavelength cavity is a key goal in nanophotonics. Perfect trapping has been realized with optical bound states in the continuum (BIC) in waveguide arrays and photonic crystals; yet the formal requirement of infinite periodicity has limited the experimental realization to structures with macroscopic planar dimensions. We characterize BICs in a silicon nanowire (NW) geometric superlattice (GSL) that exhibits one-dimensional periodicity in a compact cylindrical geometry with a subwavelength diameter. We analyze the scattering behavior of NW GSLs by formulating temporal coupled mode theory to include Lorenz-Mie scattering, and we show that GSL-based BICs can trap electromagnetic energy for an infinite lifetime and exist over a broad range of geometric parameters. Using synthesized NW GSLs tens of microns in length and with variable pitch, we demonstrate the progressive spectral shift and disappearance of Fano resonances in experimental single-NW extinction spectra as a manifestation of BIC GSL modes.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Phys Rev Lett
          Physical review letters
          American Physical Society (APS)
          1079-7114
          0031-9007
          May 10 2019
          : 122
          : 18
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3290, USA.
          [2 ] Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 28644, Republic of Korea.
          Article
          10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.187402
          31144898
          e3628814-8913-463a-bc50-f30e3d72371e
          History

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