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      The MMR Vaccine and Autism

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      Annual Review of Virology

      Annual Reviews

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          Abstract

          Autism is a developmental disability that can cause significant social, communication, and behavioral challenges. A report published in 1998, but subsequently retracted by the journal, suggested that measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine causes autism. However, autism is a neurodevelopmental condition that has a strong genetic component with genesis before one year of age, when MMR vaccine is typically administered. Several epidemiologic studies have not found an association between MMR vaccination and autism, including a study that found that MMR vaccine was not associated with an increased risk of autism even among high-risk children whose older siblings had autism. Despite strong evidence of its safety, some parents are still hesitant to accept MMR vaccination of their children. Decreasing acceptance of MMR vaccination has led to outbreaks or resurgence of measles. Health-care providers have a vital role in maintaining confidence in vaccination and preventing suffering, disability, and death from measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Annual Review of Virology
          Annu. Rev. Virol.
          Annual Reviews
          2327-056X
          2327-0578
          April 15 2019
          September 30 2019
          April 15 2019
          September 30 2019
          : 6
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Immunization Safety Office, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30329, USA;
          Article
          10.1146/annurev-virology-092818-015515
          © 2019

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