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      Daily Hemodialysis: Is It a Complex Therapy with Unproven Benefits?

      Blood Purification

      S. Karger AG

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          Control of serum phosphate without any phosphate binders in patients treated with nocturnal hemodialysis.

          We compared the efficacy and the long-term effects of nocturnal hemodialysis (NHD) versus conventional hemodialysis (CHD) in controlling serum phosphate levels in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Patients underwent thrice weekly CHD and were subsequently switched to NHD six nights weekly. In the "acute" study serum and dialysate phosphate were measured during and after dialysis, and the total dialysate was collected to calculate mass solute removal. Although pre-dialysis (1.7 +/- 0.6 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.8 mM) serum phosphate levels were similar in CHD and NHD, respectively, post-dialysis levels were slightly lower with CHD (0.7 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.8 +/- 0.2 mM, P < 0.05). The measured phosphate removed per session of CHD or NHD was comparable, 25.3 +/- 7.5 versus 26.9 +/- 9.8 mumol/session, respectively. On the other hand, the cumulative weekly phosphate removal was significantly higher with NHD as compared to CHD, 75.8 +/- 22.5 versus 161.6 +/- 59.0 mumol/week (P < 0.01). In the "chronic" study serum phosphate levels were measured monthly for five months on CHD and for five months after the patients were switched to NHD. Dietary phosphate intake and the dosage of phosphate binders were tabulated. Serum phosphate levels fell during NHD: 2.1 +/- 0.5 mM at the beginning of the study and 1.3 +/- 0.2 mM five months after being switched to NHD (P < 0.001). At the same time dietary phosphate intake increased by 50%. By the fourth month of NHD therapy none of the patients was taking any phosphate binders. In conclusion, NHD is more effective in controlling serum phosphate levels than CHD, allowing patients to discontinue their phosphate binders completely and to ingest a more liberal diet.
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            Continuous-Flow Peritoneal Dialysis

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              Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Daily Dialysis

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BPU
                Blood Purif
                10.1159/issn.0253-5068
                Blood Purification
                S. Karger AG
                978-3-8055-7186-9
                978-3-318-00668-1
                0253-5068
                1421-9735
                2001
                2001
                28 December 2000
                : 19
                : 2
                : 206-210
                Affiliations
                Humber River Regional Hospital, Toronto and University of Toronto, Ont., Canada
                Article
                46942 Blood Purif 2001;19:206–210
                10.1159/000046942
                11150811
                © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Pages: 5
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/46942
                Categories
                Paper

                Cardiovascular Medicine, Nephrology

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