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      Understanding the Climate–Water–Energy–Food Nexus and the Transition Towards a Circular Economy: The Case of Morocco

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          Abstract

          The world is currently marked by increasing pressure on natural resources and a big demand for energy, water, and food. Energy, Water, and food are strongly interlinked, and the choices made in one area often have consequences on the others. These interconnections intensify and will be more complex as the demand for resources increases with climate change, population growth, changing consumption patterns, and a linear economy model of ‘take-make-dispose’. however, a circular economy (CE) ensures that economic growth must not necessarily lead to more resource consumption. This paper aims to discuss the circular economy transition with a focus on understanding the interdependencies and complexities of system Climate-Water, Energy, and food security in Morocco. This work first outlines the problem of water resources management in Morocco and determined the areas of intersection between the food-energy-water sectors. It also attempts to explain why water circularity is part of the key factors to accelerate the transition from a linear economy to a circular economy to meet the Sustainable Development Goals, and how circularity can be implemented in the water sector. Finally, it studies two circular alternative solutions (water-saving - drip irrigation, and renewable energy) that Morocco uses to face climate change-induced water scarcity.

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          Circular economy approach to reduce water–energy–food nexus

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            Climate change and environmental concentrations of POPs: A review.

            In recent years, the climate change impact on the concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has become a topic of notable concern. Changes in environmental conditions such as the increase of the average temperature, or the UV-B radiation, are likely to influence the fate and behavior of POPs, ultimately affecting human exposure. The state of the art of the impact of climate change on environmental concentrations of POPs, as well as on human health risks, is here reviewed. Research gaps are also identified, while future studies are suggested. Climate change and POPs are a hot issue, for which wide attention should be paid not only by scientists, but also and mainly by policy makers. Most studies reported in the scientific literature are focused on legacy POPs, mainly polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and pesticides. However, the number of investigations aimed at estimating the impact of climate change on the environmental levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is scarce, despite of the fact that exposure to PAHs and photodegradation byproducts may result in adverse health effects. Furthermore, no data on emerging POPs are currently available in the scientific literature. In consequence, an intensification of studies to identify and mitigate the indirect effects of the climate change on POP fate is needed to minimize the human health impact. Furthermore, being this a global problem, interactions between climate change and POPs must be addressed from an international perspective.
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              Resource productivity enhancement as means for promoting cleaner production: analysis of co-incineration in cement plants through a life cycle approach

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                E3S Web of Conferences
                E3S Web Conf.
                EDP Sciences
                2267-1242
                2023
                January 23 2023
                2023
                : 364
                : 01006
                Article
                10.1051/e3sconf/202336401006
                e44baf7d-b67f-485d-847f-0adfb1053896
                © 2023

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History

                Earth & Environmental sciences,Agriculture,Engineering,Geosciences,Materials science,Life sciences

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