Blog
About

24
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Spatial association with PTEX complexes defines regions for effector export into Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Export of proteins into the infected erythrocyte is critical for malaria parasite survival. The majority of effector proteins are thought to export via a proteinaceous translocon, resident in the parasitophorous vacuole membrane surrounding the parasite. Identification of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins and its biochemical association with exported proteins suggests it performs this role. Direct evidence for this, however, is lacking. Here using viable purified Plasmodium falciparum merozoites and three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy, we investigate remodelling events immediately following parasite invasion. We show that multiple complexes of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins localize together in foci that dynamically change in clustering behaviour. Furthermore, we provide conclusive evidence of spatial association between exported proteins and exported protein 2, a core component of the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins, during native conditions and upon generation of translocation intermediates. These data provide the most direct cellular evidence to date that protein export occurs at regions of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane housing the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins complex.

          Abstract

          During red blood cell infection, malaria parasites export hundreds of proteins that remodel the host cell surface. Cowman and colleagues identify a putative protein translocator complex spatially associated with exported proteins, revealing the cellular domains involved in protein export.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 57

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Computer visualization of three-dimensional image data using IMOD.

          We have developed a computer software package, IMOD, as a tool for analyzing and viewing three-dimensional biological image data. IMOD is useful for studying and modeling data from tomographic, serial section, and optical section reconstructions. The software allows image data to be visualized by several different methods. Models of the image data can be visualized by volume or contour surface rendering and can yield quantitative information.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The pathogenic basis of malaria.

            Malaria is today a disease of poverty and underdeveloped countries. In Africa, mortality remains high because there is limited access to treatment in the villages. We should follow in Pasteur's footsteps by using basic research to develop better tools for the control and cure of malaria. Insight into the complexity of malaria pathogenesis is vital for understanding the disease and will provide a major step towards controlling it. Those of us who work on pathogenesis must widen our approach and think in terms of new tools such as vaccines to reduce disease. The inability of many countries to fund expensive campaigns and antimalarial treatment requires these tools to be highly effective and affordable.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Three-dimensional resolution doubling in wide-field fluorescence microscopy by structured illumination.

              Structured illumination microscopy is a method that can increase the spatial resolution of wide-field fluorescence microscopy beyond its classical limit by using spatially structured illumination light. Here we describe how this method can be applied in three dimensions to double the axial as well as the lateral resolution, with true optical sectioning. A grating is used to generate three mutually coherent light beams, which interfere in the specimen to form an illumination pattern that varies both laterally and axially. The spatially structured excitation intensity causes normally unreachable high-resolution information to become encoded into the observed images through spatial frequency mixing. This new information is computationally extracted and used to generate a three-dimensional reconstruction with twice as high resolution, in all three dimensions, as is possible in a conventional wide-field microscope. The method has been demonstrated on both test objects and biological specimens, and has produced the first light microscopy images of the synaptonemal complex in which the lateral elements are clearly resolved.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nat Commun
                Nat Commun
                Nature Communications
                Nature Pub. Group
                2041-1723
                29 January 2013
                : 4
                : 1415
                Affiliations
                [1 ]The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research , Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
                [2 ]Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne , Parkville,Victoria 3010, Australia
                [3 ]Electron Microscopy Unit, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute , Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia
                [4 ]The ithree institute, University of Technology Sydney , Sydney, New South Wales 2007, Australia
                [5 ]Macfarlane Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health , Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia
                [6 ]Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University , Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
                [7 ]Department of Parasitology, Philipps University Marburg , Marburg 35043, Germany
                [8 ]Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne , Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia
                [9 ]Department of Immunology, Monash University , Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia
                [10 ]These authors contributed equally to this work
                Author notes
                Article
                ncomms2449
                10.1038/ncomms2449
                3562467
                23361006
                Copyright © 2013, Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivative Works 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

                Categories
                Article

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article