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      Workers compensation-reported injuries among security and law enforcement personnel in the private versus public sectors

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          Abstract

          Background

          Private and Public security and law enforcement (SLE) sectors perform multiple overlapping job duties.

          Methods

          Workers’ compensation (WC) SLE first reports of injury (FROI) data (2005–2015) were analyzed to describe injuries, identify differences in awarded WC benefits, and compare the probability of a FROI resulting in awarded benefits between Public and Private SLE. A Pearson’s chi-square test was utilized and reverse selection logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratio that a FROI would result in an awarded benefit for Private vs. Public SLE, while adjusting for relevant covariates.

          Results

          Private SLE had higher FROI percentages for younger and for older workers, fall injuries, and back injuries, compared to Public SLE. The adjusted odds that a FROI resulted in an awarded benefit was 1.4 times higher for Private SLE compared to Public SLE; (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09,1.69). Middle-aged SLE employee adjusted odds of awarded benefits was 3.3 times (95% CI [1.96, 5.39]) higher compared to younger employees. Adjusted odds of awarded benefits was 3.8 times (95% CI [1.34, 10.61]) higher for gunshots and 1.7 times (95% CI [1.22, 2.39]) higher for fractures/dislocations compared to other nature of injuries. Motor vehicle injury, fall/slip, and strain related FROIs had elevated adjusted odds of awarded benefits compared to other injury causes.

          Conclusions

          Results highlight the importance of injury prevention education and worker safety training for Private and Public SLE sector workers on fall prevention (especially in Private SLE) and strain prevention (especially in Public SLE), as well as motor vehicle safety.

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          Most cited references 6

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          Fatal occupational injuries among U.S. law enforcement officers: A comparison of national surveillance systems

          This study describes and compares the three surveillance systems used to record occupational injury fatalities among U.S. law enforcement officers (LEOs).
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            Compensation benefits in a population-based cohort of men and women on long-term disability after musculoskeletal injuries: costs, course, predictors.

            The aim of this study is to assess costs, duration and predictors of prolonged compensation benefits by gender in a population characterised by long-term compensation benefits for traumatic or non-traumatic musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs). This study examined 3 years of data from a register-based provincial cohort including all new allowed long-term claims (≥3 months of wage replacement benefits) related to neck/shoulder/back/trunk/upper-limb MSIs in Quebec, Canada, from 2001 to 2003 (13,073 men and 9032 women). Main outcomes were compensation duration and costs. Analyses were carried out separately for men and women to investigate gender differences. An extended Cox model with Heaviside functions of time was used to account for covariates with time-varying effects. Male workers experienced a longer compensation benefit duration and higher median costs. At the end of follow-up, 3 years postinjury, 12.3% of men and 7.3% of women were still receiving compensation benefits. Effects of certain predictors (e.g., income, injury site or industry) differed markedly between men and women. Age and claim history had time-varying effects in the men's and women's models, respectively. Knowing costs, duration and predictors of long-term compensation claims by gender can help employers, decision makers and rehabilitation specialists to identify at-risk workers and industries to engage them in early intervention and prevention programmes. Tailoring parts of long-term disability prevention and management efforts to men's and women's specific needs, barriers and vulnerable subgroups, could reduce time on benefits among both male and female long-term claimants. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
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              Injuries among solid waste collectors in the private versus public sectors.

              Solid waste collection is among the occupations with the highest risk for injuries and illnesses. Solid waste collector injuries were characterized in terms of injury risk and employment industry sector (public versus private) using Kentucky workers' compensation first reports of injury and claims data. When compared to 35-44-year-old workers, solid waste collectors who were under 35 years of age were less likely to have a workers' compensation first report of injury or claim that resulted in awarded benefits. The probability that a workers' compensation first report of injury or claim would result in an awarded benefit was higher if the worker was employed as a solid waste collector in the private sector compared to the public sector, or was injured due to a motor vehicle-related injury or a push-or-pull type of injury. A better understanding of the differences in the contributing factors for an injury that results in a first report of injury or claim with awarded benefits (e.g., job activities, new and refresher worker safety training, type of equipment used, differences in collection vehicle automation, and differential reporting of injuries on the job) between the public and private sectors is necessary to target injury prevention strategies in this high-risk occupation.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                859-351-3493 , w.witt@uky.edu
                859-257-4955 , tlbunn2@uky.edu
                Journal
                Inj Epidemiol
                Inj Epidemiol
                Injury Epidemiology
                Springer International Publishing (Cham )
                2197-1714
                2 July 2018
                2 July 2018
                December 2018
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1936 8438, GRID grid.266539.d, Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center, , University of Kentucky, ; Lexington, KY USA
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1936 8438, GRID grid.266539.d, Department of Epidemiology, , University of Kentucky College of Public Health, ; Lexington, KY USA
                [3 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1936 8438, GRID grid.266539.d, Department of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health, , University of Kentucky College of Public Health, ; Lexington, KY USA
                [4 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1936 8438, GRID grid.266539.d, Department of Biostatistics, , University of Kentucky College of Public Health, ; Lexington, KY USA
                Article
                156
                10.1186/s40621-018-0156-9
                6026584
                29961925
                © The Author(s). 2018

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000125, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health;
                Award ID: 2460OH008483-13
                Categories
                Original Contribution
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2018

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