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      Genetic differences in the tail-suspension test and its relationship to imipramine response among 11 inbred strains of mice

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      Biological Psychiatry

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          The tail suspension test (TST) is a simple screening test for the behavioral effects of antidepressants in rodents. This experiment investigated the interindividual differences in responses to stressful situations measured by duration of immobility in the TST and the effects of imipramine (30 mg/kg intraperitoneally) in reducing immobility among 11 inbred strains of mice. The 11 inbred strains were 129S6/SvEvTac, A/J, AKR/J, Balb/cJ, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, NMRI, SencarA/PtJ, and SWR/J. All mice underwent two trials of TST: 1) spontaneous, basal TST and 2) imipramine or saline TST. The duration of immobility was the trait measured during a 6-min test. In the four strains tested, female mice had longer duration of immobility than male mice in basal TST duration of immobility. For male mice (n = 11 strains), significant strain differences in immobility duration were found for both basal TST and imipramine response TST, with heritability estimates of .31 and .60, respectively. Immobility duration for the DBA/2J, FVB/NJ, and NMRI strains were significantly reduced by imipramine, relative to saline. Surprisingly, this reduction of immobility by imipramine was independent of the basal immobility. These results suggest that the responses on basal TST and the imipramine-mediated responses on TST are mediated by separate genetic pathways.

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          Behavioral phenotypes of inbred mouse strains: implications and recommendations for molecular studies.

          Choosing the best genetic strains of mice for developing a new knockout or transgenic mouse requires extensive knowledge of the endogenous traits of inbred strains. Background genes from the parental strains may interact with the mutated gene, in a manner which could severely compromise the interpretation of the mutant phenotype. The present overview summarizes the literature on a wide variety of behavioral traits for the 129, C57BL/6, DBA/2, and many other inbred strains of mice. Strain distributions are described for open field activity, learning and memory tasks, aggression, sexual and parental behaviors, acoustic startle and prepulse inhibition, and the behavioral actions of ethanol, nicotine, cocaine, opiates, antipsychotics, and anxiolytics. Using the referenced information, molecular geneticists can choose optimal parental strains of mice, and perhaps develop new embryonic stem cell progenitors, for new knockouts and transgenics to investigate gene function, and to serve as animal models in the development of novel therapeutics for human genetic diseases.
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            The genetic basis of complex human behaviors

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              Depression in women: implications for health care research.

               M Weissman,  M Olfson (1995)
              Epidemiologic data from around the world demonstrate that major depression is approximately twice as common in women than men and that its first onset peaks during the childbearing years. Progress has been made in understanding the epidemiology of depression and in developing effective treatments. Much remains to be learned about the basic pathogenesis of depression and the specific treatment needs of depressed women and their offspring, especially during the reproductive years.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Biological Psychiatry
                Biological Psychiatry
                Elsevier BV
                00063223
                April 2001
                April 2001
                : 49
                : 7
                : 575-581
                Article
                10.1016/S0006-3223(00)01028-3
                11297714
                © 2001

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