4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Prevalence of fibromyalgia in fourteen Korean tertiary care university hospital pain clinics

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Purpose

          We aimed to investigate the prevalence of fibromyalgia (FM) in patients who visited outpatient pain clinics in Korea, using the modified 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and to evaluate comorbid conditions that may be associated with FM.

          Patients and methods

          Outpatients, aged ≥18 years, who first visited pain clinics at any of the 14 tertiary care university hospitals, were recruited for this study. Modified 2010 ACR criteria were used to diagnose FM. Participants’ demographic information and eleven comorbid measures (sleep disturbance, fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, amnesia, hypothyroidism, headache, anxiety, depression, rheumatism, low back pain, and history of traffic accident) were also investigated via additional questionnaires.

          Results

          We recruited 1,233 outpatients (754 men and 479 women). Based on the modified 2010 ACR criteria, 13.38% (165/1,233 patients, 95% CI: 11.48–15.28) of patients had FM. As participants with a history of FM were excluded, the prevalence of FM was 11.0% (123/1,118 patients). Patients with FM were more likely to have one or more of the eleven predetermined comorbid conditions. Patients who were female and who had a previous history of FM, sleep disturbance, headache, or a history of traffic accident were more likely to have FM.

          Conclusion

          FM, according to the modified 2010 ACR criteria, appears to be a common disorder among chronic pain patients referred to tertiary care university hospital pain clinics. Therefore, physicians treating pain should consider this prevalence of FM among pain clinic patients.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 12

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Evidence of augmented central pain processing in idiopathic chronic low back pain.

          For many individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP), there is no identifiable cause. In other idiopathic chronic pain conditions, sensory testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have identified the occurrence of generalized increased pain sensitivity, hyperalgesia, and altered brain processing, suggesting central augmentation of pain processing in such conditions. We compared the results of both of these methods as applied to patients with idiopathic CLBP (n = 11), patients with widespread pain (fibromyalgia; n = 16), and healthy control subjects (n = 11). Patients with CLBP had low back pain persisting for at least 12 months that was unexplained by MRI/radiographic changes. Experimental pain testing was performed at a neutral site (thumbnail) to assess the pressure-pain threshold in all subjects. For fMRI studies, stimuli of equal pressure (2 kg) and of equal subjective pain intensity (slightly intense pain) were applied to this same site. Despite low numbers of tender points in the CLBP group, experimental pain testing revealed hyperalgesia in this group as well as in the fibromyalgia group; the pressure required to produce slightly intense pain was significantly higher in the controls (5.6 kg) than in the patients with CLBP (3.9 kg) (P = 0.03) or the patients with fibromyalgia (3.5 kg) (P = 0.006). When equal amounts of pressure were applied to the 3 groups, fMRI detected 5 common regions of neuronal activation in pain-related cortical areas in the CLBP and fibromyalgia groups (in the contralateral primary and secondary [S2] somatosensory cortices, inferior parietal lobule, cerebellum, and ipsilateral S2). This same stimulus resulted in only a single activation in controls (in the contralateral S2 somatosensory cortex). When subjects in the 3 groups received stimuli that evoked subjectively equal pain, fMRI revealed common neuronal activations in all 3 groups. At equal levels of pressure, patients with CLBP or fibromyalgia experienced significantly more pain and showed more extensive, common patterns of neuronal activation in pain-related cortical areas. When stimuli that elicited equally painful responses were applied (requiring significantly lower pressure in both patient groups as compared with the control group), neuronal activations were similar among the 3 groups. These findings are consistent with the occurrence of augmented central pain processing in patients with idiopathic CLBP.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Prevalence of fibromyalgia: a population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota, utilizing the Rochester Epidemiology Project.

            To estimate and compare the prevalence of fibromyalgia by 2 different methods in Olmsted County, Minnesota. The first method was a retrospective review of medical records of potential cases of fibromyalgia in Olmsted County using the Rochester Epidemiology Project (from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009) to estimate the prevalence of diagnosed fibromyalgia in clinical practice. The second method was a random survey of adults in Olmsted County using the fibromyalgia research survey criteria to estimate the percentage of responders who met the fibromyalgia research survey criteria. Of the 3,410 potential patients identified by the first method, 1,115 had a fibromyalgia diagnosis documented in the medical record by a health care provider. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of diagnosed fibromyalgia by this method was 1.1%. By the second method, of the 2,994 people who received the survey by mail, 830 (27.6%) responded and 44 (5.3%) met the fibromyalgia research survey criteria. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of fibromyalgia in the general population of Olmsted County by this method was estimated at 6.4%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the rate at which fibromyalgia is being diagnosed in a community. This is also the first report of prevalence as assessed by the fibromyalgia research survey criteria. Our results suggest that patients, particularly men, who meet the fibromyalgia research survey criteria are unlikely to have been given a diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Fibromyalgia.

              Fibromyalgia is a common illness characterized by chronic widespread pain, sleep problems (including unrefreshing sleep), physical exhaustion and cognitive difficulties. The definition, pathogenesis and treatment are controversial, and some even contest the existence of this disorder. In 1990, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) defined classification criteria that required multiple tender points (areas of tenderness occurring in muscles and muscle-tendon junctions) and chronic widespread pain. In 2010, the ACR preliminary diagnostic criteria excluded tender points, allowed less extensive pain and placed reliance on patient-reported somatic symptoms and cognitive difficulties. Fibromyalgia occurs in all populations worldwide, and symptom prevalence ranges between 2% and 4% in the general population. The prevalence of people who are actually diagnosed with fibromyalgia ('administrative prevalence') is much lower. A model of fibromyalgia pathogenesis has been suggested in which biological and psychosocial variables interact to influence the predisposition, triggering and aggravation of a chronic disease, but the details are unclear. Diagnosis requires the history of a typical cluster of symptoms and the exclusion of a somatic disease that sufficiently explains the symptoms by medical examination. Current evidence-based guidelines emphasize the value of multimodal treatments, which encompass both non-pharmacological and selected pharmacological treatments tailored to individual symptoms, including pain, fatigue, sleep problems and mood problems. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/LIBdDX.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2018
                17 October 2018
                : 11
                : 2417-2423
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea, painfree@ 123456snubh.org
                [2 ]Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea
                [3 ]Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
                [4 ]Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
                [5 ]Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Severance Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea
                [6 ]Seoul Chan Pain Clinic, Seoul, Republic of Korea
                [7 ]Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea, painfree@ 123456snubh.org
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Pyung Bok Lee, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gumi-dong 300, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si 13620, Republic of Korea, Email painfree@ 123456snubh.org
                Article
                jpr-11-2417
                10.2147/JPR.S172221
                6200436
                © 2018 Lee et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Anesthesiology & Pain management

                tertiary care centers, chronic pain, diagnosis, fibromyalgia

                Comments

                Comment on this article