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      Does smoking really protect from recurrent aphthous stomatitis?

      Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management

      Dove Medical Press

      recurrent aphthous stomatitis, smoking, prevalence

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          To study the effect of smoking on the prevalence of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) and to examine whether intensity and duration of smoking influence RAS lesions.

          Subjects and methods

          A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a random sample of 1000 students of The University of Jordan, Amman, between May and September 2008. Sociodemographic factors and details about smoking habits and RAS in last 12 months were collected.

          Results

          Annual prevalence (AP) of RAS was 37.1%. Tobacco use was common among students: 30.2% were current smokers and 2.8% were exsmokers. AP was not significantly influenced by students’ age, gender, marital status, college, and household income but was significantly affected by place of living ( P = 0.02) and presence of chronic diseases ( P = 0.03). No significant difference in AP of RAS was found between smokers and nonsmokers. Cigarette smokers who smoked heavily and for a longer period of time had significantly less AP of RAS when compared to moderate smokers and those who smoked for a shorter period of time. The protective effect of smoking was only noticed when there was heavy cigarette smoking (>20 cigarettes/day) ( P = 0.021) or smoking for long periods of time (>5 years) ( P = 0.009). Nevertheless, no significant associations were found between intensity or duration of smoking and clinical severity of RAS lesions.

          Conclusion

          The “protective effect” of smoking on RAS was dose- and time-dependent. When lesions are present, smoking had no effect on RAS severity.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Ther Clin Risk Manag
          Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
          Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
          Dove Medical Press
          1176-6336
          1178-203X
          2010
          2010
          22 November 2010
          : 6
          : 573-577
          Affiliations
          Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
          Author notes
          Correspondence: Faleh Sawair, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan, Tel +962 6 5355000 ext 23571, Fax +962 6 5300248, Email sawair@ 123456ju.edu.jo
          Article
          tcrm-6-573
          10.2147/TCRM.S15145
          2999509
          21151626
          © 2010 Sawair, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

          This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

          Categories
          Original Research

          Medicine

          prevalence, smoking, recurrent aphthous stomatitis

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