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      Nasal High-flow versus non-invasive ventilation in stable hypercapnic COPD: a preliminary report

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          Abstract

          Background

          There are no data available about effectiveness of Nasal High-flow (NHF)in chronic respiratory insufficiency.

          Methods

          Eleven COPD patients with stable hypercapnia were adjusted to NHF-system with a flow of 20 l/min. After six weeks patients were switched to non-invasive ventilation (NIV) for another six weeks period.

          Results

          NHF led to significant decreases in resting pCO 2. Between the devices we found no differences in pCO 2 levels.

          Conclusions

          NHF may thus be an alternative treatment device in stable hypercapnic COPD patients.

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          Most cited references 5

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          Nasal high-flow versus Venturi mask oxygen therapy after extubation. Effects on oxygenation, comfort, and clinical outcome.

          Oxygen is commonly administered after extubation. Although several devices are available, data about their clinical efficacy are scarce.
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            High-Flow Nasal Oxygen vs Noninvasive Positive Airway Pressure in Hypoxemic Patients After Cardiothoracic Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

            Noninvasive ventilation delivered as bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) is often used to avoid reintubation and improve outcomes of patients with hypoxemia after cardiothoracic surgery. High-flow nasal oxygen therapy is increasingly used to improve oxygenation because of its ease of implementation, tolerance, and clinical effectiveness.
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              Effects of nasal high flow on ventilation in volunteers, COPD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients.

              A high flow of air applied by large bore nasal cannulae has been suggested to improve symptoms of chronic respiratory insufficiency. In pediatric patients, nasal high-flow (nHF) ventilation was similarly effective compared to noninvasive ventilation with a face mask.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                +493419712450 , highflow@web.de
                hans-juergen.seyfarth@uniklinik-leipzig.de
                hubert.wirtz@uniklinik-leipzig.de
                Journal
                Multidiscip Respir Med
                Multidiscip Respir Med
                Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine
                BioMed Central (London )
                1828-695X
                2049-6958
                3 September 2015
                3 September 2015
                2015
                : 10
                : 1
                Affiliations
                Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 20, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
                Article
                19
                10.1186/s40248-015-0019-y
                4559207
                © Bräunlich et al. 2015

                Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                Categories
                Original Research Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2015

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